[SDS] Bad dog, Mojo

[Reading Time: 2m 28 sec]

My dog Mojo has a problem.

Well, it’s not a problem so much as a disposition, and maybe some trauma somewhere in his past. Honestly I don’t know. But he’s anxious and gets stressed out easily.

A few years ago he began to get aggressive with strangers and other dogs. He seemed stressed out. This made my wife and I stressed out. We wanted to protect him, and protect other people and dogs fromhim. We decided to send him to training camp.

Yes, there are dog sleepover camps!

Mojo’s trainer, Reuben, did a wonderful job. We trust Reuben a lot. So much so that Reuben is now the only non-family member we entrust Mojo to when we’re away.

If Reuben recommends a service provider, or a product, or just about anything else that would help Mojo, we’ll listen. We trust Reuben. He’s the expert to us in all things dogs. So when Mojo got stung by a bee and Reuben took him to the local emergency pet clinic, we trusted that clinic. Why? Because Reuben trusted the clinic, and we trusted Reuben.

 
Trust - Reuben.png
 

I’ve been flirting with this idea of “trust transitivity” for a while. Remember the transitive property in math?

If A is greater than B, and B is greater than C, then A must be greater than C.

Trust works just like that, but it’s a little more complicated. While I trust Reuben as a dog expert, I won’t be asking him for advice in growing my podcast or writing better emails to you every day. That’s not his jam.

This is why referral relationships are so important to you and your business: people who’ve already built trust with you will recommend others who might need your help. There’s nothing more powerful than that! Well actually…

There are also network effects that can promote trust and accelerate referrals. I wrote recently about how I monetized my podcast. The reason advertisers buy in is they want to take advantage of the network I’ve created. Listeners (and readers like you!) trust me when it comes to sales, and so listeners will implicitly trust my advertisers to some degree because they get my implicit endorsement. Of course listeners know that ads are paid endorsements, so that counteracts trust a little bit, but you get it.

This is a clear demonstration of the monetary value of trust. 

I’ve been flirting with this idea of “trust transitivity” for a while. Remember the transitive property in math? 

If A is greater than B, and B is greater than C, then A must be greater than C.

Trust works just like that, but it’s a little more complicated. While I trust Reuben as a dog expert, I won’t be asking him for advice in growing my podcast or writing better emails to you every day. That’s not his jam.

This is why referral relationships are so important to you and your business: people who’ve already built trust with you will recommend others who might need your help. There’s nothing more powerful than that! Well actually…

There are also network effects that can promote trust and accelerate referrals. I wrote recently about how I monetized my podcast. The reason advertisers buy in is they want to take advantage of the network I’ve created. Listeners (and readers like you!) trust me when it comes to sales, and so listeners will implicitly trust my advertisers to some degree because they get my implicit endorsement. Of course listeners know that ads are paid endorsements, so that counteracts trust a little bit, but you get it. 

This is a clear demonstration of the monetary value of trust.

Now let’s apply this to another domain: referral relationships. I was speaking with a client as part of my professional services sales research project and his only sales strategy is to leverage client relationships that other people have built.

It looks like this:

So if you’re a CPA, attorneys are a great referral source because they’ve already built deep trust with the market. But they also have a potential network effect. Attorneys typically don’t have a single client, unless their in-house counsel. Which means they can refer to many clients. 

Let’s look at another market. If you’re a CX/UX consultancy, you’re in the business of creating amazing experiences. You might want to create relationships with software development agencies. You might also look for relationships existing trusted sources of information – i.e. industry associations that your clients belong to, or media outlets that provide education about CX/UX. 

Whatever you do, the key idea is to understand how to build and leverage trust. And since there are people out there who’ve already built it, see how you can gain their trust.

Like what you read? Sharing is caring.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Ready to sell more services? Get the free crash course.

Get the free Systematic Selling Crash Course to learn the specific skills you’ll need to sell more services.

Like what you're reading?

Get updates sent straight to your inbox.

Don’t miss the latest articles, podcasts, and videos on how to attract, win, and deliver to better clients.