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Cold Email and Outbound Marketing with Jason Bay of Blissful Prospecting (Part 1 of 2)

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Are you fisher, or a hunter? Your sales and marketing strategies should have a mix of both. Jason Bay of Blissful Prospecting walks through the details of how he uses cold email and outbound marketing to win and build business.

Mentioned in this episode:

Blissful Prospecting
Connect with Jason on LinkedIn
Book a Strategy Call with Liston
LinkedIn Sales Navigator
Apollo.io
LeadIQ
NeverBounce
Mailshake Mail Merge Tool
Woodpecker
Nova.ai

For more information on remote selling and a complete list of links mentioned in this podcast, visit this remote selling article on our website.


Cold Email and Outbound Marketing with Jason Bay of Blissful Prospecting (Part 1 of 2):

Full Transcript

Liston Witherill:
Welcome to Modern Sales, a podcast for entrepreneurs, business owners, and salespeople looking to have more and better conversations with your perfect clients. You’ll get a healthy scoop of psychology, behavioral economics and sales studies to help you create win-win relationships. I’m your host, Liston Witherill, and I’m pleased to welcome you to Modern Sales. Since you’re here and you’ve taken the time to listen, I have a question. Is this helpful? If so, will you tell someone about it? That’s all that I ask. If you have any issues with your own business, if you’re looking to scale up your sales and build a scalable system, obviously my guest today, Jason Bay, will be able to help you with that, but I’d also be happy to talk to you about getting your systems in place, increasing some of your lead flow, figuring out what things you can target to make small but meaningful compounding changes to your business to start to grow revenue.

Liston Witherill:
If any of that sounds interesting, all you have to do is go to Liston.io/strategy to apply for a strategy call with me and I will take a look at your application and if there’s a fit for us to talk, we will talk. That’s all I have to say about that and I am excited to have my guest today, Jason Bay. Jason, how are you?

Jason Bay:
I’m doing good man. Thanks for having me on.

Liston Witherill:
Now, you’ve very patiently sat through my whole pitch. So now I want to turn it over to you. Tell us the name of your company and what it is that you do.

Jason Bay:
Yeah, the name of her company is Blissful Prospecting. I founded the business with my wife Sarah, and what we do and why the business was started was that I worked in corporate America as a marketing director for a large construction company for awhile until 2011, or 2014, excuse me. During that time I was working for them from 2011, 2014 I always wanted to go out and do my own thing and help other businesses with what I was doing at that time, marketing. When I left, I sort of went through this and I think most consultants go through this, you sort of tell everyone in your network, you post it on LinkedIn, you post it on Facebook, you tell your friends and family and you get some good word of mouth and business is awesome for like six, nine months and you’re so glad you left your job.

Jason Bay:
Then when that dries up you start thinking about, “Well, how am I going to find new clients? I’m maybe creating some content and people aren’t really coming to me.” For a couple of years I just dabbled around with LinkedIn. I heard about this cold email thing and really the reason why we started Blissful Prospecting is that I noticed most of the resources at that time were focused on companies trying to break into the Fortune 500 or selling enterprise solutions like Salesforce with predictable revenue. That’s sort of where it originated with Aaron Ross out there and we were looking at that and we’re like, “Well, how does this apply to a small business? What if it’s someone just doing it by themselves or just has a couple of employees?”

Jason Bay:
So we wanted to take that tech stack and the whole and kind of simplify it because you don’t need all of those things as a small business owner, and at Blissful Prospecting, we wanted to provide a solution for small business owners that maybe didn’t have the time or expertise to do this themselves and just completely taken off their hands and do it for them.

Liston Witherill:
There’s two words in the name of your business, Blissful Prospecting, and for most people I think that would be an oxymoron. Why? Why the name Blissful Prospecting? What is so blissful about it?

Jason Bay:
Good question. I think there’s some really important things here that I just learned by trial and error. One was when you start a business, I really like to look for what’s referred to as a blue ocean strategy, where you’re looking for a way to find a market that has a big potential, but very limited competition. We originally looked at starting a marketing agency and the reason why I didn’t want to name it Blissful Marketing is that now we’re competing with thousands of marketing agencies just in the United States alone. With prospecting, we wanted to focus on something very specific so that we could eventually productize the business and make it very simple to understand what we’re doing and make it very repeatable.

Jason Bay:
Blissful, the reason why we chose that word is I was trying to look for words that sort of captured the opposite of what people told me their experience with prospecting is, excuse me, was. Everyone hates prospecting for the most part that I talked to and people just kind of looked at it like this thing like, hey, if I prospect, that’s like me implementing a new workout routine that I got to do every day and it’s just one extra thing I got to worry about with my business and most of our customers that we help, the people that we’re setting up the appointments for are typically founders and they’re not sales oriented people. They want to do the creative part of their work or the relationship part. They don’t want to do that. I don’t know if that answers your question or not, but that’s why we picked the name Blissful Prospecting.

Liston Witherill:
No, it does. I totally get it. What we’re going to dig into really quickly, dear listener, this is what’s coming as I’m going to ask Jason some technical questions and how he thinks about prospecting, and he uses a lot of cold outreach techniques and he’s way into the cleanliness of the data and the tools he uses and sequencing and cadences and so we’re going to get to that in a second. But I do have a question for you just prior to that, and that is I believe businesses should have at least the majority of the ownership over their growth levers, right? They should at least understand like what is Jason doing. How do you think about how much a company could or should offload to you? Is there any danger in giving you too much of the responsibility?

Jason Bay:
I believe just your security as a business owner, you should never offload your entire acquisition to another company, which is why we only help on the prospecting front. Typically, what we’re looking for in companies we help in the marketing pie is that they’re already doing the inbound portion, right? They’re already good at networking, getting word of mouth, they have content marketing, they’re posting on social, and then we’re just adding a component to that that actually helps their business get more out of their inbound spend. It’s putting that content they’re creating in front of people that might not be looking at it otherwise.

Jason Bay:
So we try to stay away from people that are just relying on us for their growth. It puts too much unfair pressure on us too because it can take several months for you to get our outbound campaign, especially if you don’t have a lot of experience with who your ideal client is and being able to profile those people. Sometimes it takes time to find those. I don’t like that pressure of being the only growth channel. So to answer your question, no, I don’t think that you should rely on us completely for your growth.

Liston Witherill:
Cool. So let’s talk about outreach and what you’re doing as a growth channel. So if you could just summarize really quickly before we get into the technical details, what is it that your specifically doing for clients? I’m guessing they could also do a lot of this stuff themselves.

Jason Bay:
If you want to think of it, the best analogy I can think of is with fishing. With marketing, we’re not telling you that you should only do outbound or that inbound is bad. We want you to do everything. It’s good to have a healthy marketing mix. To use the fishing analogy, inbound is like casting a wide net, right? You’re going to catch a lot of things that you don’t want to catch when you’re using a net to fish and you’re probably not going to catch a whale with a net, right? The whales are what we refer to as the big clients, like your dream clients that have the biggest budget, that get the best bang for their buck with you, that give you the testimonials, that make the best case studies, et cetera. To find a whale, you got to go hunting for a whale and you need to bring a spear with you. Outbound is that spear. This is sort of a continuation of Aaron Ross’ analogy he uses in predictable revenue.

Jason Bay:
So with the outbound component, what we’re helping you do is basically take everything you’re doing with inbound and say, “How can I take this content and this copy and all of that stuff and say, how can I find other clients like my dream clients that are probably not looking for my solution or will find me on Facebook or LinkedIn or wherever it is I’m posting and how can I proactively find them?” So what we’re doing is we’re helping you, A, identify who your dream client is more specifically than just saying, “Hey, I work with construction companies.” Well, no, like what size are they, what are their needs? Then from there it’s how do I build a list of those companies? How do I find more of them? Who are the right decision makers at those companies?

Jason Bay:
Then from there we worry about messaging. So we’ll create the email copy. I think this is where a lot of people make mistakes as they focus so much on the email copy that they forget to look at am I emailing a company that actually needs what I am offering? Am I putting this message in front of the right person? Then the message is, hey, is this addressing a goal that’s important to this person, a challenge they might be having or a specific result that they’re seeking, right? Then from there we’re doing the outreach for our clients, sending out the emails and managing via email account for them so that all they have to do is hop on the phone and run the meetings that we set up for them.

Liston Witherill:
So you mentioned two things there, needs and goals. One thing that I’ve found myself in putting together my own outbound strategies, and in full disclosure, this isn’t something I do a lot of, but I do a lot of outreach for various reasons. New marketing partners come on my podcast, hey, we should be referral partners, like that kind of stuff. But if I wanted to put together a list of 100, 200, 500 dream accounts, what are some ways that you think about identifying what their needs and their goals are likely to be?

Jason Bay:
The best way to start with this is to look at who am I already working with that I like working with. So hopefully, if you’re listening to this, you have at least one client you really like working with.

Liston Witherill:
Yes, I agree with that.

Jason Bay:
Now, that’s where I would start. So the reason why that’s important is I don’t look at market research like looking at stats and census data. To me, market research is when I ask a person what their goals or challenges are, I’ve captured the information and the quote that they give me from that because they’re going to tell me exactly what they need. So I would start with your existing clients. Who do you like working with? Who has, again, big budget? Who gave you the testimonies? Et cetera. From there, what you can do, I liked using LinkedIn Sales Navigator. So if you’re looking for the most inexpensive way to do this and you still have some money to spend, LinkedIn Sales Navigator is 80 bucks a month. What it’s going to do is give you access to the entire LinkedIn database and it’s going to give you parameters that you can search for that you’re not going to get with a normal LinkedIn profile.

Jason Bay:
So for example, you can search by employee count at a company, which is really important. So what you’re going to do is you take that client that you like working with and then look at what LinkedIn says about them. LinkedIn is going to tell you the number of employees they have, how they categorize their industry. It’s going to tell you other companies that are similar to them. It’s going to give you the roster of people that work there and that’s where I would start. LinkedIn creates that lookalike profile for you right there. It’s going to give you all the parameters for that company. Then what I would do is I would think about what does this company want to accomplish, and you should already know this, right? If you’re selling lead gens, let’s say you’re doing freelancing for Facebook ads or Google ads or you’re doing some sort of pay-per-click, theoretically, you should already know why the client is using your services.

Jason Bay:
If you don’t know that, you offer to give the client something free for their 15 minutes of their time, and asking these things, why are you working with me? What is this helping you accomplish with your business? Don’t accept an answer of, well, you’re helping me generate leads. Well, no, what is that doing for your business and your bottom line and your revenue? That’s what people care about the most, typically. So you got to tie in your solution with an actual business goal. It’s really easy with what I do is prospecting. That’s essentially tied to and revenue. But I don’t focus on, we can set more sales appointments for you, no. We’re going to grow your sales pipeline, which is going to grow your revenue, right? Those are the things that you want to focus on.

Liston Witherill:
So is it fair to say you’re not looking at the individual needs of one of the people in your list? You’re saying companies like this probably have one, two or three needs and we can solve those and therefore if I prospect other companies like this, they’re likely to have some of these needs. But I don’t know for sure if any individual has those needs.

Jason Bay:
Exactly.

Liston Witherill:
Okay.

Jason Bay:
Both are important, right? When you’re building your list of companies, you’re just looking at companies that have a need for what you’re doing.

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jason Bay:
So for example, if you sell Facebook ads and Google ads, what you might do on LinkedIn is you can search, there’s a technology filter. There’s another tool called Apollo that we use if you do have some money to spend on this. What you can do is look for companies that have a Facebook Pixel installed on their website already that indicates, hey, they’re probably doing some advertising or some remarketing or whatever on Facebook already. Once you find on the company level what those people need, then you can build a big list of those companies. One thing that you said that’s so important there is you said these are companies that are likely to have a need and you need to have that same sort of language when you write an email copy to the… Oh, big mistake I see people make as being too assumptive and saying, “Hey, we do this. I know that you need this.”

Jason Bay:
Well, you don’t know and you should be a little humble and people are going to be more willing to talk to you if you’re treating it more like, hey, I’ve done my research. I think that we might be able to help you with this based on what I know.

Liston Witherill:
Right. Okay. So we talked about digging into some of the technical details. So we know that we’re going to have to make an assumption about companies that are likely to have a need, but we don’t know for sure if they have it. We talked about, or you talked about, here, I’m saying we, I’m taking credit for everything you’re saying. You talked about using LinkedIn Sales Navigator, which I totally recommend, and also I think you and I both are using LinkedIn as a growth channel.

Jason Bay:
Definitely.

Liston Witherill:
So that’s like a whole episode unto itself, but I do recommend Sales Navigator if you do any B2B selling is an excellent tool. If I want to start to go and build this list, you mentioned Apollo. What are my considerations about list cleanliness and hygiene? Because I’ve personally, I’m sure you’re familiar with all the cheap tools out there, like one of them that I recommended was FindThatLead and I find that only about one in three leads that it produces are valid. What do I need to consider if I’m building that list and I want to go email everybody on that list?

Jason Bay:
So there’s two components, right? There’s the account or company data and then there’s the contact or the prospect data. So what you’re looking for, LinkedIn Sales Navigator is a really good tool for account data, but it doesn’t necessarily give you email addresses in LinkedIn, right?

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jason Bay:
So with the account side, you would definitely want at a minimum for the tool to tell you things like employee count. You want them to tell you things like their industry and it’s nice to be able to do tech stack searching as well.

Liston Witherill:
Which you can do on Sales Navigator, by the way, I just wanted to insert that.

Jason Bay:
Exactly. Before we get into the contacts, there’s a couple other ways, you don’t just need to use. As oftentimes what we’ll do too is like if we’re looking for a big list of construction contractors, right? Because our client, one of their industry verticals that they’re a marketing agency is construction. You can also look on directories and review sites and things like that to build a big list of construction contractors and then you can search for them in LinkedIn or have a VA or someone do it and upend the data. So a lot of times what we’ll do is we’ll build the list outside of Apollo, outside of LinkedIn, and then upload it into Apollo and then it upends all that beautiful data to it, right?

Liston Witherill:
Oh, I see.

Jason Bay:
In terms of contact data, this is really the big pain point in B2B sales in this industry is finding good reliable data. What I would recommend is two different tools. We really like Apollo, but I mean, they’re going to make you commit to a yearly contract in order to use their system and it’s not cheap. So if you’re doing a ton of prospecting, Apollo’s great to check out. If you’re not, I would check out LeadIQ and what LeadIQ will do is it syncs up with Sales Navigator. So you can do those account-based searches, tag the companies, and then you can start looking at the contact data and LeadIQ will actually tell you if the email is verified or not. So that’s another feature you need to consider is is it going to tell me if this is a verified or unverified email.

Jason Bay:
So in other words, verified is telling you, hey, 95% likelihood that this is an accurate email address. Unverified, we don’t know. We’re just kind of guessing based on how all the other email addresses are put together with that company. I recommend not sending those emails out because if your bounce rate is too high, if it’s five to 10% plus, what it’s going to start doing is a lot of your emails are going to start going to people’s spam folders. So there’s an extra layer that we do. We use a tool called NeverBounce. It’s neverbounce.com. So we’ll even take what Apollo says is great data and then again we’ll find another 10% of that are bad email addresses after we run it through a NeverBounce. Then we’ll upload it into whatever tool we’re using to send emails and send them.

Liston Witherill:
Let me just recap my understanding of that because this is the process I’ve used whenever I built a list too. So essentially you go out, you collect the accounts, that companies that you want to target. Then you find the people at those companies. Then you’re using a tool to enrich the data. So get the person’s email address.

Jason Bay:
Yeah.

Liston Witherill:
Then you verify the email addresses, you throw away anything that doesn’t have a 95% chance of deliverability and then you cleanse it a second time and you make sure a second time are these email addresses valid, and once again, throw away anything that doesn’t hit that 95% threshold. Am I right?

Jason Bay:
Exactly. What we found again is Apollo is sort of the best on demand for this stuff. LeadIQ is a close second. The only reason I say LeadIQ is second is just their system is just not as robust for being able to search because it’s relying on LinkedIn. But a lot of them, their incentive is to sell you data, right? Not to necessarily give you the most accurate data possible.

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jason Bay:
Let me know if you want to talk about what contacts you should be emailing at companies too.

Liston Witherill:
Please. Yeah. So is the question, how do I decide which people or what titles to target?

Jason Bay:
Yeah.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, go ahead.

Jason Bay:
We recommend a top down approach. So the smaller the company, the higher up you’re going to start at the company. So a good rule of thumb that we found is if the company is under 50 employees, you’re always going to email a founder of that company or an owner or a CEO type person. The reason for that is likely all the decision making is going to happen at the very top of those companies. So if it’s 50 plus, I would start at whatever C-level person would be in charge of that. So if you’re selling marketing services, that’s an easy one, right? It’s the marketing department. It’s your CMOs. Then I would work down to VP and director. We try not to email anyone that’s manager or below. They just don’t have a lot of decision making power. If it’s sales, their sales departments, that’s really easy to find.

Jason Bay:
Where you might run into some stuff is if you’re doing some consulting for something really technical, right, and you need to reach out to the engineering department or maybe they have a chief technical officer. Just keep in mind, the person you’re sending the email to, you want to make sure that it’s something they deal with on a daily basis and you’re starting as high up in the company as possible because what’s going to happen a lot of times if they’re not the person to handle it is they’ll send an email to their VP or director saying, “Hey, you need to talk to this guy, Liston. He shared this PDF that I think we need to start using.”

Liston Witherill:
Now you got a referral.

Jason Bay:
Yeah, they’re definitely going to hop on the phone with you because their boss said. Whereas, the director who might just be in the shit, I don’t know if I could say that actually.

Liston Witherill:
No, go for it man. No, let it fly. We’re honest here.

Jason Bay:
Just in the shit on a daily basis. Let’s say it’s with sales, like with your stuff and he or she might just be so busy and have such a big ego that they feel they don’t need help with that, right? They’re not the one that makes the budget decision anyways. So always start top down and make sure you’re emailing the right department, and sometimes depending on what you’re selling, this can be a little tricky to find. But we have a database that we create with all of the departments and then all of the weird titles that sometimes companies might use, a risk manager or a safety manager, like what the apartment is that? Is it HR? I think so. Start documenting those things. You should know this, if you’re working with a customer in this industry, this is a great question you can ask them too.

Liston Witherill:
I don’t want to get into the specifics of copywriting. So I interviewed Jon Buchan on a previous episode. You can go back and listen to that if you’re interested in-

Jason Bay:
Great episode.

Liston Witherill:
The specific copy. However, I am wondering about your overall strategy in terms of your call to action in these emails. So I see three typical ways people go about this. One call to action is who’s the person in charge of X? They’re looking for referral. That’s the Aaron Ross strategy. The second one is, hey, would you like to hop on a call, which I think is pretty aggressive considering you’ve never met this person. The third one is you’re looking for some form of engagement. So you’re prompting them with a question where they’re hopefully going to engage with you and answer a question that may lead to whatever service or product you’re offering. How do you think about calls to action? What do you recommend?

Jason Bay:
I think there’s a couple of rules of thumb here. One, do you want to be the least assumptive person that you can? So a call to action has to be in the form of a question. So if you’re just saying… It’s no different than closing. If we’re in a sales call right now and I’m like, “Yeah, so I definitely want to work with you, Liston. You’re like, there’s like this awkward pause, right? It’s like, okay, like do you have to ask the person to get a response and hopefully what you’re looking for is something that could be answered with a yes or no. So the answer to your question is all three methods can work. You have to try them. It depends on who you’re emailing. So if you’re doing the top down approach, if you’re emailing let’s say a chief marketing officer, because you do Facebook ads and Google AdWords consulting at a 500 person company, the CMO is not going to hop on the phone with you and talk to you more than likely.

Jason Bay:
So I’m going to ask that person, “Hey, is there anyone on your team that might benefit from this PDF or this ebook on how to do this? Or a 15 minute call where I can share two or three ideas on what you guys could do better. Here’s one of those ideas.” I like the referral approach, but just keep in mind that you’re asking that person a lot by sharing with someone else at the company, right? So you still have to have all the credibility factors, you can’t be too assumptive, et cetera. That call to action works really well on low tech industries, construction industry, insurance industry, healthcare, all of these industries where they’re not using marketing and sales tools like you and I are every day. These people would much rather prefer to hop on a call and not email back and forth, right?

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jason Bay:
But again, I don’t like to be too assumptive. I don’t say, “Hey, want to use my scheduling link here and schedule a meeting?” That’s just so assumptive for the first meeting. I like to stuff like, hey, interested in chatting further or does it make sense to chat about this?

Liston Witherill:
Yes.

Jason Bay:
Does this sound interesting? Yes or no? Right? Something like that. You get a commitment and then it’s easy to schedule from there. The last form I do like also. So what you could do is you could say something like, “Hey, I’m not really sure if the timing is great on this, Liston. But are you having any challenges with your marketing acquisition or getting new clients for whatever?” Right? Something very specific. Is this a challenge of yours, or hey, if we were able to get this type of result for you, would this be helpful? Yes or no? Something like that. You’re kind of putting the fillers out to see if they’re interested in exactly what you can help them with. Does that answer your question?

Liston Witherill:
It does. Totally. That’s excellent. Now, in the last scenario, like trying to solicit some sort of conversation or really getting the person to commit to a yes or no. Basically, identifying I have this problem that you might be able to help me solve. Are there particular instances when you find that’s more or less helpful as an approach?

Jason Bay:
If you’re selling something that the prospect might understand, so for example, like what I sell, prospecting services, is really easy. Everyone knows what prospecting is and that they should be doing more of it, right? So I can be really simple in my call to action. But if you’re selling something… So we have a client, for example, that sells… They work with companies like Salesforce and they find ways for them to save money on taxes using all these different tax codes and all this other stuff. It’s very technical and the person that we’re emailing does not understand what that is, right?

Jason Bay:
So for them it’s, hey, I know there’s a lot of complicated tax codes out there and you probably don’t have the time to keep up on them. Would it be helpful if I ran through some of the ones that might apply to you in a phone call? Okay, so if it’s really technical, you gotta focus on not the service or product that you’re selling, focus on the solution that it creates or alleviating time or keeping someone from wasting something, right? In this case it was money. I don’t know if that answered your question or not. I find the more technical it is, the more willing I am to ask for a phone call at the beginning just because it’s easier and the more basic I am and what it is that I’m doing, if that make sense.

Liston Witherill:
I see. Yeah, that totally makes sense. The last thing I want to cover in this part one of two parts that where we’re going to chat is cadence. Cadence just means how many times you’re going to reach out to somebody. Is it over email? Is it on the phone? Is it through snail mail or LinkedIn? What’s the frequency or the time in between each step? So how do you think about putting together both the frequency and the timing between each step?

Jason Bay:
Yeah, this is a tough one and there’s lots of ways to do it. A good rule of thumb is you want to make sure the cadence is adding value to whoever it is you’re emailing. So it can’t just be a, hey, did you get my last email? Or Hey, I’m just following… The words follow up should never be in the email, in the followup email sequence. I would say we just do email and our service right now. But in an ideal world you’d want to do email, phone and social. So I would say between those three, 10 to 12 touches over the course of two or three months would be ideal. So this could be I send a couple emails and then if I don’t hear back, I give them a call, I add them on LinkedIn, et cetera.

Jason Bay:
To keep it simple for this example, what I would recommend to something like this. It’s just what we do when we email. So we’ll typically send eight to 10 emails in total depending on the industry that we’re reaching out to. So let’s just say that we’re doing eight. So the first email will go out on a Monday or Tuesday and then the second email got 48 hours after that. Then the next email after that will go out a week from then and then a week and then a week and then two weeks. Then we’ll wait 30 days between that and the next one. You want to make sure that you’re not torturing the prospect by sending too many emails. I heard someone say, “Oh yes, [SAS 00:26:47], they’re so fast paced. We sent four emails in four days.” I’m like, “No, that’s not a good idea.” Because the one thing that you don’t get to really see is, well, hopefully your tool is showing you how many people are unsubscribing.

Jason Bay:
But when people unsubscribe to your email or send it to spam, that’s telling their email client, Google or Outlook that, hey, when someone else gets an email from that domain, we should start sending it to spam. So you’re just ruining all credibility in your domain and your deliverability rate. You’re ruining that if you’re sending too many emails. The first couple I like to do 40 hours apart and then to spread it out a week in between the emails and then maybe a couple of weeks and then one 30 days. There’s nothing wrong with having an email sequence that’s six months long if it’s spread out.

Liston Witherill:
That’s what I was going to say. So by the time you start inserting two weeks, 30 days, you’re really looking at, yeah, four to six months of emails, is that right?

Jason Bay:
Yeah. Typically, ours are like two to three months usually. But the big thing here is remember when you’re doing outbound, these people didn’t come to you.

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jason Bay:
So the assumption that I see people make all the time is that the person they’re reaching out to knows that they have a problem, they know that you’re the person that can fix it and they know how to fix it, right? Those are a lot of assumptions. You have to not only educate the prospect with your outreach, but you also might’ve caught them at a really bad time. So if you do all of it over the course of two or three weeks, a lot changes in a quarter, in a year, right? So if you’re not maintaining contact, you’re kind of just blowing your shot at working with this company by bugging them too much.

Liston Witherill:
My final question for you, and we’re going to leave a little cliffhanger here, is do you do anything after that two to three month sequence that you’re sending? Don’t answer it. We’re going to come back to you in tomorrow’s episode. So go ahead and hit subscribe if you haven’t already, but just in case they don’t listen to part two, which I think they’d be crazy not to do, Jason, but if they don’t listen, how would they get a hold of you?

Jason Bay:
Best place is BlissfulProspecting.com. Just a couple of things I would check out. One, I would make sure to check out our newsletter. So I typically send this out every other week and it’s got actionable tips in there to help you grow your business from a sales and prospecting standpoint. So I typically spend five to 10 hours a week or so consuming content and I put that in email you can consume in five or 10 minutes. So it’s got recommended tools, articles, templates, et cetera. On LinkedIn, what I’ve been doing every week is a cold email breakdown. If you follow me on LinkedIn and look at my stuff, I essentially take a cold email that I receive or one of our clients receive, or that someone submits to us and I break it down. So I tell them what they should have done better and I talk as if I’m the prospect. I would say those are the two best ways you can get an idea for free sort of what we do and my style and our company’s style and that sort of thing.

Liston Witherill:
Awesome. I just want to say Jason didn’t pay me to say this and I didn’t tell him I was going to, but your newsletter is one of the few that I read every time I get it. I also highly recommend your cold email breakdowns on LinkedIn. So take him up on that and hit subscribe so you can get part two of my interview with Jason.

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Check out the four sales fundamentals every top performer masters, how to use value-based selling to increase your leverage, and how to improve your remote selling skills as the world becomes more virtual.

And check out the SDS method if you want to improve your sales process.

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