Welcome to Modern Sales

LinkedIn Prospecting For the Win with Jake Jorgovan

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn is a powerful prospecting tool that consultants can use to find new clients. Jake Jorgovan shares his thoughts and expertise on how consultants can turn LinkedIn into a lead generating machine.

For more information on remote selling and a complete list of links mentioned in this podcast, visit this remote selling article on our website.


LinkedIn Prospecting For the Win with Jake Jorgovan:

Full Transcript

Liston Witherill:
Welcome to Modern Sales, a podcast for entrepreneurs, business owners and salespeople looking to have more and better conversations with your perfect clients. You’ll get a healthy scoop of psychology, behavioral economics and sales studies to help you create win-win relationships. I’m your host, Liston Witherill, and I’m pleased to welcome you to Modern Sales.

Liston Witherill:
Hello and welcome once again to the Liston.io show. My name is Liston Witherill, your fearless stop selling, start serving host. I am here with Jake Jorgovan, and Jake, before you start talking, I want to give you a little bit of love here. You are the founder of Lead Cookie, a done for you LinkedIn prospecting service and we’ve actually shared clients so I know what you’re doing is actually working and I am stoked to have you here because one of the questions I get a lot when it comes to selling is, “How do I know if I have a lead or a sales problem?” And so I wanted to really bring some content from the people who are there on the front lines doing outbound sales for agencies and consulting firms. So Jake, welcome.

Jake Jorgovan:
Thanks for having me on here, Liston.

Liston Witherill:
Absolutely. I am really interested to hear what you have to say about done for you LinkedIn prospecting, so why don’t we start there? How did you get into that and what does that even mean?

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, so I actually got into this because prior to running Lead Cookie and everything, I was basically doing consulting for agency owners and consultants in a sense where I was basically helping them with running their outreach processes, with building their lead generation and just helping them with their sales processes. So, just a holistic consulting, and I kept focusing around in my whole consulting around this idea of how do agencies and consultants win new clients. That was just the question I kept trying to answer. At some point, I kept realizing I was getting business from LinkedIn and I saw some of my clients were getting business from LinkedIn. This was just randomly posting or just being active or just using the platform a little bit. I hadn’t put too much intentionality behind it.

Jake Jorgovan:
So at some point I decided, okay, I’m going to get serious, and what’s going to happen if I really put some effort and learned everything I could about LinkedIn? So I went out and I researched all the thought leaders like John Nemo and Josh Turner and looked at what they were doing and what they were teaching, and I just started testing out some of the tactics and running them. I was just blown away because in the first 30 days, I think I booked 11 phone calls, and within the first two months I had closed three deals from this. And I was just like, okay, wow, that worked really well. You know, I’ve had other tactics that I’ve done that have been really effective, but they always took a lot longer. And so that just really shocked me. I did that for my own consulting at first and then eventually we that’s when the idea for Lead Cookie came to actually start doing that for other people.

Liston Witherill:
Excellent. And so you’ve been doing for a while now, and I’m sure you’ve had all kinds of clients, but I do want to focus on companies that provide consulting services, so that could be marketing agencies or architects or accountants or lawyers or people who are selling their expertise essentially. Now, do you find that there’s a difference in the way those people should be using LinkedIn, and how does that work? What do you think are the basics that they would need to know in order to get started with this?

Jake Jorgovan:
The biggest thing that I always tell people is that the value proposition and your positioning is everything with this. To just really hammer that home, we have run … By the end of this month, I think we’ll be up to 85, almost 90 campaigns we’ve run through this exact same framework. We use the exact same process. These are the rough four messages we send and we just tweak them for someone’s messaging or their specific value proposition. We do the exact same thing for all 80, 90 of these accounts, and you see massively different results. You see some people who we’ve had to give refunds to because there was no results and then you have other people that are like, “Okay, can we go at 25% speed? Because I can’t keep up here.” And the difference is completely in the value proposition and what they’re actually bringing to the market; basically, having a good target and a clearly defined proposition of what they’re bringing them.

Liston Witherill:
Do you find that there’s a difference in the effectiveness of this strategy for people, say, selling to really large, maybe Fortune 500 companies versus smaller medium businesses?

Jake Jorgovan:
It can work in both. I would say when you go to bigger companies, it can still definitely work. We’ve had some accounts where we just basically said, “Okay, here’s 50 large companies and that’s our target. We’re going to put in the companies on LinkedIn, we’re going to put in all the titles because within any of these companies, there’s probably 40 or 50 divisions that could hire us.” And so we’ve done campaigns that way where we’ve gone after big companies and a bunch of different titles within, and so that’s been effective. We’ve also at the same time, we have a lot of clients where they’re targeting companies of 11 to 50 people or even one to 10 employees, and you’ve got this massive pool of prospects you can go after. So we’ve seen it work both on the high and low end. I think the high end, you probably get a little less volume when you’re going after a big corporate, but most of the time companies that are going after companies of that size, their deal size is large enough to warrant it.

Liston Witherill:
Yeah, interesting. If I understand correctly, and you can tell me if I’m wrong, what you do is you figure out who to go after based on the value proposition and the ideal customer type. You go connect with them and then you send them several messages. When and if someone responds to one of those messages … This is the biggest question I get from everybody on LinkedIn is, “How do I then start a conversation effectively?” What do I do next? It’s almost like this, “Uh-oh, they responded. What now?” So how do you respond to that?

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, this question is near and dear to my heart because I’m literally working on an advanced lead nurturing course for our customers right now to help them with this, because it’s not always straight clear. One of the biggest things I always tell people is again, first of all, try to mirror them. If they write you a big response, you can write a big response back to them too. But the biggest mistake and probably the number one mistake I see people make and that we have to just catch our clients on early and stop them from doing is they send the messages, we hand them a lead. The lead says, “Oh yeah, this looks really cool.” Or they answer a question or they engage in a conversation, and then our client just pitches and there they go. They get one response from the person and then they just pitch. You’ll see a lot of those just go dead.

Jake Jorgovan:
Really, the better thing is unless the person’s asking you for a pitch, what you want to try to do is just be conversational. Look into their profile. What did they just say back to you or respond to you with? Try to play off of that, ask some questions, and try to volley a conversation back and forth a couple times. Not just some random conversation about the weather, but a conversation somewhat around your value proposition, what you’re doing. When I discuss, I’m like, “What are you guys doing for lead generation?” Or, “How do you get most of your leads?” I ask about that, what’s working for them, what’s not working, what their experiences have been, and only then when I feel like I’ve really honed in enough or we’ve gotten enough information or they seem to start showing some interest, then I’ll basically make a pitch for the call. I think that biggest thing that people make the mistake of is pitching too early or never pitching at all and just conversing back and forth. I was on a call with a guy earlier today where it’s art of finding the middle ground of when you actually go and ask for the meeting.

Liston Witherill:
Yeah, and I think also I’ve noticed, because I’m really active on LinkedIn and I use it as I’d say primarily as a content channel, but I noticed that timing is a big factor. So, I wanted to talk about that for a second. You said you get a response and then you do something conversational. You do a little bit of homework, God forbid you have to learn about them, and you give them something to respond to essentially; a question or you tell them something you noticed and you want to learn more about it. Are you then engaged in conversation on LinkedIn and how do you deal with the timing component when … For most people, it’s not Facebook where if you message them, they’re not going to get it immediately necessarily or they may not hang out on LinkedIn. Is that a factor for you when you think about how to prospect effectively on LinkedIn? Do I need to be available 24/7? How quickly do I respond? How do you think about the timing?

Jake Jorgovan:
One thing that’s handy is with LinkedIn, they actually show a little green dot on someone’s profile or even in the chat window if they’re online. So if you ever get someone responding to you and you’re responding back and the green dot’s there, you might want to hang around and try to nurture that because if you can get … It’s pretty cool when you get with a prospect and you can actually see them chatting back and forth and stuff. That’s pretty great engagement and you can build a lot of trust by responding really quickly there. When you can catch that, that is great. It’s not realistic for most people to sit around and hang on LinkedIn all day. We have some of our clients that have it on their phone and they will go through and they check on their phone throughout the day.

Jake Jorgovan:
Personally, myself, I still can’t handle that. What I do is I batch it all in one spot during the day and reality, that probably could hurt my conversion from monitoring it 24/7, but I’m a business owner and I have other things to do and I think most people in the spot where they’re consultants or agency owners, they probably can’t just hang there all day like a full time salesperson could. So, I think it helps if you can catch it, but I don’t think it’s detrimental. You can still get great results even if you’re not there live.

Liston Witherill:
Right. Yeah, I agree with what you just said. I think for most people, it’s probably not practical to just hang out on LinkedIn, but I think that begs another question. So let’s say … You gave a couple scenarios of the relative success you’ve had with different clients. Some people will get … Or I think you said in your first month you got 11 phone calls. Some people are getting so many that they’re saying, “Jake, calm down, man, I can’t handle this. Please turn it down to medium low.” So if you’re in a situation where you’re getting so many leads that you know that you probably can’t handle the volume, how do you then start thinking about qualifying people so that you’re taking calls with the people who are mostly likely to need your help? Is that something that’s even on your radar with your clients?

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, so one of the things we do and with our general approach, we send our connection request and the first message after a connection request is a conversation starting question, is the thing we send it right after they accept our connection request. The goal with that is to not just start a conversation but hopefully gather some information too. Again, for example, I asked, “Hey, what are your primary lead generation channels?” We have other customers where it’s, “Hey, what are your thoughts on react verse angular?” Or stuff like that. You’re starting on that. When they respond to that, you typically get some intel which is going to help you qualify them a bit. So for me, depending on what someone says, if they’re like, “Oh, we’ve been around for 25 years and we’ve got more business than we can handle,” it’s like okay, you’re probably not my customer then. But if I’ve got someone who’s like, “Oh, word of mouth and referrals,” or, “We tried cold email and we failed,” or stuff that, then those are things that I can build off of and qualify.

Jake Jorgovan:
So with volume, basically weave a question in there, weed out quickly, the people that just don’t seem great fits because there’s going to be a lot come through. And then even beyond that first question, try to think of what are other questions you can regularly ask people to quickly qualify them. Because the other weird thing is you’ll have a lot of people that just want to get on calls with you and they’re not qualified. At times, I have to do that and just ask a few more questions before we hop on a call. Asking questions is probably one of the biggest things to just weed down to who the good prospects are.

Liston Witherill:
A couple of things I’ve found too is this week someone asked me, “Hey, I’m going to be in Portland, Oregon in June. Let’s meet up for beer. I’d love to learn more about what you’re doing.” While I love to have beer with people, it is something I like to do, I also want to make sure it’s focused basically on something. Because when that happens, and I’ve found this when I connect with a lot of local people, they’re, “Let’s have coffee, let’s have beer.” And I’m always wondering, well, what is your intention for that meeting? Do you want something from me? Do you need some of my help? I don’t know what to do about that. So I’m always trying to push a little bit more to either have a really short call, so maybe have 10 or 15 minute call just to understand what are they looking for or ask them a few more questions on LinkedIn.

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, that’s typically where I go. If someone’s super antsy for the meetings, yeah, I often will just like you said, probe for those questions and everything. Because the other risk is sometimes some of those spots people want to sell you back, so that’s always something I’m cautious of if they’re in a company or a position where they might be trying that as well.

Liston Witherill:
Yeah. How do you deal with that scenario on LinkedIn? Because I get a lot of that. People go, “Well, let’s get on the phone,” and what they really want to do is sell me something. Is that something you’ve had to deal with at all?

Jake Jorgovan:
I pretty much tackle that head on before we get on the call. I’m not pretty bashful about it. I was like, “Well, I just want to make sure to clarify that I’m not interested in this. But if you’re needing lead generation for this, then I’m happy to talk more.” Whenever I have a financial planner or something, I always ask that before I get them on the call, because they’re the worst kind sometimes.

Liston Witherill:
But Jake, I’m wondering, are you fully insured?

Jake Jorgovan:
What do you mean by fully insured?

Liston Witherill:
Do you need some extra insurance? I’m wondering if all of your family’s insurance needs are met.

Jake Jorgovan:
Exactly, that’s the trick.

Liston Witherill:
Exactly. So, you mentioned positioning. That’s a really valuable thing to have in place because I find it helps focus that person’s mind on whatever the area is or direction that I want to talk to them about. Is there anything else that people need in place for this to be an effective strategy for them?

Jake Jorgovan:
The other thing is once you have your positioning, just to get your profile optimized and looking good, so getting your headline tweaked to where that’s going to be eye catching and engaging because that’s going to pop up all over LinkedIn. The profile and the headline is definitely a big one. And then the other thing is just to have some sort of … Again, the third message that we send is a drip article or some sort of content or case study or something useful. So, that’s the thing with outbound, and we just even discussed this on the interview that we did together, is you have less trust with these outbound leads. A lot of times they’re going to want case studies or they’re going to want testimonials or more examples of your work, so having stuff that prepared is really good. I wouldn’t go into an outbound campaign unless you’ve got at least a couple of case studies ready and a decent website in place because people look at all that kind of stuff.

Liston Witherill:
Right, yeah. I do find that, that I get a decent amount of traffic from LinkedIn, from people who I’m inviting to connect or maybe who see my content. I don’t know exactly how they end up on my website, but I do agree with that. Okay, so you and I did a whole episode, which I’ll link to in the show notes here about inbound versus outbound and what the differences are. But I notice even though we answered all the possible questions in that one single piece of content …

Jake Jorgovan:
The best interview ever.

Liston Witherill:
Exactly, exactly. I’m glad you see it that way, because you’re right. I noticed when I talk to owners of consulting businesses, typically they have zero experience with any sort of outbound or what I think more accurately proactive lead generation tactics or new business generation tactics. And so, they’re used to someone emailing them, someone being referred to them, follow on work from clients. It’s characteristically very different. The way I would summarize that is you have no trust or credibility built up. You’re contacting this person, they have no idea who you are, and secondly, we have no idea if now’s the right time for them. So, these are two gigantic differences between someone coming to you versus you going to them based on some sort of demographic characteristic. What’s your advice to people who, they’re your client, it’s working, they’re getting their five, 10, 20 calls, however many calls in a month. What’s your advice to them on how to deal with this new source of potential business that they’ve never dealt with before? What do they really need to know?

Jake Jorgovan:
I think the biggest thing is that they need to have … you know, with inbounds or referrals, you can kind of be a crappy salesperson and get by. With this, you have to up your game a bit and you have to build processes and systems. Even if it’s just you and you’re just doing it for yourself, you have to dedicate the time. For myself, every other week I spend at least one to two hours going through all of my LinkedIn leads and being like, “Who do I need to nudge again? Who do I need to go back and didn’t respond that looked like a really good lead. Where did these conversations drop off?” And I do that about every two weeks.

Jake Jorgovan:
The other thing is you’ve got to have a way to nurture those people that are saying, “Hey, not right now but let’s chat in three months,” because those are good leads. You have an ideal prospect buyer who’s just at the wrong point in the cycle. So, building something to nurture those people, whether that’s a quarterly time where you go back or even just getting them on your newsletter, but something to nurture people is really important. But really, that every other week process of just going through and nudging people and not taking just, oh, the conversation died as it’s over. But just realizing that you’re going to have to do more work. You’re going to have to nudge people. You’re going to have no shows for calls that you have to reschedule because at this point you’re just some name on the internet who they don’t even associate as a real human being yet. And until you get them on the phone and you start building a relationship, they could blow you off. They could just not answer. But when you show persistence and you keep following up, that’s what can actually get to those conversions.

Liston Witherill:
I’m glad you said a few things there. One thing you said that I completely agree with is this issue of timing. I coach and consult with people on their sales process, and a question that I get pretty frequently is, “What do I do when it’s the wrong time for someone?” The answer of course is, ask them when might be the right time and follow up with them then.

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah.

Liston Witherill:
Because they’re used to getting inbound leads, I think, a lot of people think, “Well, if someone says it’s the wrong time, that means it’s never going to be the right time.” That’s not what that means at all. It actually genuinely may be the wrong time. I mean, my wife and I bought a house about a year and a half ago, and when agents would call me, I would say, “You know, we’re not interested right now.” Once we started looking, right? We weren’t ready to buy yet. Took about six months to look and find a place that we wanted. What I found fascinating about that is exactly zero agents followed up with me monthly. Zero, and I probably talked to 20 of them, and yet ultimately I bought a house and someone got a pretty nice commission check when I did. So, I think that the follow-up is really imperative and having some organization is really imperative too. Do you recommend to your clients that they need a CRM or they just use a spreadsheet, or how do they track all of this?

Jake Jorgovan:
Having a CRM, something in place there is good. We give them everything with an Airtable, which is actually not a great overall CRM. It’s just good for the purposes that we use it with LinkedIn. We typically have people export it to something else. But even with that, even if you use a CRM and you set reminders, it’s really easy to just let those reminders pile up.

Liston Witherill:
Oh, yes.

Jake Jorgovan:
I’m pretty sure I’ve got 11 setting in my pipe drive notification today.

Liston Witherill:
It’s like a graveyard of all the things you were supposed to do a month ago.

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, which is why the biggest thing I recommend is blocking out that time to just do follow-ups. For me, that’s the only way that I’ve ever found because when I just get a ping from, “Oh, do that one follow up today,” it’s like, I got other things going. But if I just get a batch of them together, that’s the way that I’ve always found for myself worked well for me to actually get them done.

Liston Witherill:
I totally agree with that and I think that the follow-up is really critical because if you think about anything you’ve ever bought in your life, you probably started shopping for it way before you bought it. Maybe I’m speaking for myself, but I just bought a fancy camera and I’ve been thinking about doing that for years. Amazon, I can promise you, never gave up on me. They were selling me a fancy camera the entire time. It’s something that I think we can all take note of.

Jake Jorgovan:
We had a client sign last week that came literally from the very first test week of outreach we ever did for Lead Cookie back when it was called LinkedIn Panda, was the early name. This was literally one of the first sales calls I ever had. And they were just like, “Oh no, not ready.” And they literally have come back 10 months later and just signed up. And so, that just gives you an idea. I kept following up with them quarterly that entire time and they just converted to a customer. So, that just shows you what that value can do there.

Liston Witherill:
Yeah. And so on the follow-up, one thing I tell people is you don’t want to just reach out every time and say, “So, what’s going on? You ready yet? You ready yet?” I mean, obviously it’s okay to say, “Is there anything I can do to help?” But another thing you mentioned was about having content. So putting them on a newsletter or maybe some sort of automated quarterly thing. I like to reach out manually because somehow people can detect the difference. But the nice thing about creating content on a regular basis is it’s not only something helpful that you can give someone, but it’s also a billboard. It’s also like, remember me? You don’t have to say, “Remember how we talked about I, Jake Jorgovan, can help you with your LinkedIn.” They just remember that when you send them something, and so I think that that’s really valuable. As a provider of expertise, you must have something valuable to share. Something that seems totally mundane and obvious to you probably isn’t to someone else. I think that that’s a valuable thing to think about.

Liston Witherill:
Now, maybe I’m in the throes of it, Jake, but the more I use LinkedIn, the more confused I am by how it all works and all of the nuances within the algorithm. Do you see anything changing on LinkedIn or do you have any maybe not inside information because I’m sure they keep it secret, but do you have any inkling as to how LinkedIn is changing and how this may change in the future if you’re looking to prospect on LinkedIn?

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, I’m on there a lot. And one of the things, you know, I had an advisor for a short period who was involved with LinkedIn in an advisory capacity. One of the things he shared with me, their vision for LinkedIn is to sit at the epicenter of sales. That is a really interesting mission. How that’s going to unfold, I don’t know, But whenever I told him I had fears because I’m like, “I’m kind of scared, because I’m building my business on this platform that’s this moving foundation underneath us.” And he’s like, “Look, yeah it’s going to move, it’s going to change, it’s going to disrupt you at some point in time. But they’re trying to put themselves with … Sales Navigator and Recruiter are the two biggest products where they make most of their money and those are just sitting at the epicenter of sales and recruitment where they are just changing how those games are being played.” And so, it’s only going to get more and more building that out and making that sitting at the center of that. So if you’re not using LinkedIn for sales, they’re trying to make it the future and I think they’re doing a pretty good job with it.

Liston Witherill:
I mean, I tend to agree with you. I also think that LinkedIn is the only paid social network. I mean, you can pay them money to be on there and have a better experience. There’s no other massively adopted social network that has that going for it. So, I think that gives them a lot more latitude and a lot more flexibility about how they treat the network. So, how do I know if I’m a consulting business owner, how do I know when is the right time to do something this? What things might be going on with my business or what signs should I take as this could be the time for some sort of proactive outreach, whether it’s LinkedIn or something else?

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah. I think the point where it’s good is whenever you have validated your value proposition and you’re ready to expand, and you need to test out another growth channel. You’ve gotten your existing customers, but you’ve just never succeeded in outbound before, but you’ve got a good value proposition, I think is a good spot. And the other thing, and I put an article on my website on just how to validate a value proposition fast, if you are trying to test your messaging, doing outreach on LinkedIn is a good way to do that. You can quickly put together a target and if you’re saying, “Okay, let me see, are manufacturing companies really my target market for my offer?” And you can try to do outreach … Because one of the things that I’m a big believer is if you can sell completely cold people on your value proposition, then you’ve got a pretty good value proposition. So I think using it, maybe not doing it in mass scale, but trying to do just a few hundred and seeing what kind of engagement you get, I think can also be a really good test to just try to validate your messaging or what you’re doing there.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, so messaging is one. Can you think of other types of problems or issues that people might have that would make this a good idea to start pursuing?

Jake Jorgovan:
If you are just ready to scale as well and you’re just ready to ramp up sales, I mean, it’s … For a very good number of people, if you’ve got a good niche market, it is a phenomenal channel. Even if you’re doing cold email or you’ve got other things going, I just look at this as another tactic in the arsenal. Cold emails is a method, cold calling as a method, LinkedIn as a method. Those are all different outbound channels, and so I just look at that as another tactic to add to the arsenal whenever you’re ready for growth and you’ve got the capacity or the time to handle it as well, as it does take some time to do and to nurture this. So, probably don’t do it if you’re overwhelmed and you don’t have time to actually nurture and to the leads.

Liston Witherill:
All right. I have a couple salient recent questions that I got and I’d love to hear your response. One was, I emailed with a prospect of mine who I met at an event. I spoke at this event and she said, “I don’t have a standard thing that I sell. Everything that I do is completely bespoke consulting, and therefore there’s no sense in me having a sales process.” What would you say to that, Jake?

Jake Jorgovan:
I would say that’s absolutely ridiculous. There’s got to be a process of some sort or otherwise, she’s never going to be able to sell that to someone she doesn’t know. The only people are going to buy that are people that trust her and know her really well. So at some point, if her inbounds or referrals dry up there, then she’s in a tough spot. That’d be my opinion.

Liston Witherill:
I also would say that I would separate the idea of process, which is a sequence of steps designed to achieve a result, from the content that goes into that process. The way you conduct an initial sales call may be different, right? But you still need the initial sales call. You still need a milestone where there’s commitments.You still need a milestone where you make an offer and ask the person what they think. So, I think that I would separate those two things out as well.

Jake Jorgovan:
I’ll add something on there as well, just to even fit into that. I don’t do as much of this, but when I was doing heavy consulting, I used to do these process called a sales teardown and a strategy blueprint. It was just a framework of meetings and feedback documents, but the content was bespoke, as this woman would say, every time. But it was just a framework that I took people through to give them access to all of my thoughts and ideas for growing their business. It puts it into a framework that’s not necessarily like this is a product, but even if what you’re doing is bespoke, you can still guide people or create products in a sense there that become custom in how you actually deliver them each time.

Liston Witherill:
All right, final question for you, Jake. I’m just going through all the hits right now. I talk to a lot of consultants and agency owners who say some variation of this: “All of my work comes from referrals. I don’t sell. Selling isn’t something that I do.”

Jake Jorgovan:
Yeah, you’re selling still, even if it’s coming to inbound or referrals, but literally learning to sell, there’s no getting around that if you want to grow your business and be stable. There is no getting around it. I don’t know how many agencies I’ve spoke to that are like, “Oh, I’m not a good salesperson,” so they just go hire a salesperson and waste a ton of money because it doesn’t fix the problem that they haven’t fixed for themselves. Everyone, I say invest time into learning sales. Learning marketing and sales, I don’t care who you are; if you’re a business owner, you need to learn those, even if going to eventually hire people to fill them in. You’ve got to learn those skills yourself. There’s no other way.

Liston Witherill:
I totally agree. I mean, I think it’s interesting. I heard from someone, they asked that very question. They said, “Well, can I just outsource this? Do I really need to learn how to sell? Can I just do my work?” They were a developer or programmer or something that. I asked them, “Well, why don’t you just go get a job if that’s what you want?” You’re going to abdicate your direct line to revenue to someone else. You might as well just work for someone else so all you have to do is your expert thing. But as a business owner, you really need to learn how to bring in money if that matters. I think most people are … It’s a hobby if you’re not bringing in money, right? So I totally agree with you. All right, Jake. Well, you’ve been very kind and a good sport. I’ve put you on the spot a few times. Tell all of the listeners how they should get a hold of you or follow up with you.

Jake Jorgovan:
The best place is just over at leadcookie.com where you can learn all about our done for you LinkedIn prospecting service. Actually, if you go to leadcookie.com/ebook we give away an ebook on all of our tactics for free and don’t even require an email opt-in. So, just literally give that away to you guys, let you see all of that. And then if you want to see any of my podcast or the awesome interview I did with Liston on inbound and outbound, you can find that over at jake-jorgovan.com

Liston Witherill:
Awesome. And once again, I’ll link to that in the notes. Jake, you have been a true gentleman and generous with your time. Thanks for being here.

Jake Jorgovan:
Thanks for having me on here, Liston.

Stay In the Loop

Get a daily sales insight sent straight to your inbox – sign up for our newsletter.

Like what you heard? Help us get the word out! Just leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. It’ll take you less than a minute and it’ll help us spread the word about Modern Sales.

Subscribe

Get Serve More Weekly, an email newsletter with one article, podcast episode, and stories from around the web. Every Monday.

Up next…

Check out the four sales fundamentals every top performer masters, how to use value-based selling to increase your leverage, and how to improve your remote selling skills as the world becomes more virtual.

And check out the SDS method if you want to improve your sales process.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn