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Negotiation Plan Strategy with Jeb Blount

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You may have thought deeply about negotiation before, but do you have a plan for it? Learn how a negotiation plan strategy can help you find a winning deal that gets you more of what you want, while still delivering what your clients needs.


Negotiation Plan Strategy with Jeb Blount:

Full Transcript

Jeb Blount:
Once we’ve decided we need to plan for a negotiation it allows us to identify all the stakeholders, what are the stakeholder lists? What motivation does each stakeholder have in order to get the deal done? So what’s their level. Are they people that are for us or against us?

Jeb Blount:
We’re able to take a look at the negotiating parameters. So the parameters are typically the things that I can and cannot negotiate. And the parameters also are what’s the risk to the parties, right? So, that’s important. If it’s a really high-risk situation, then you need to de-risk it if you want to get people to agree on a deal.

Jeb Blount:
It’s going to include all the things that you can and cannot negotiate. So these are the things that are non-negotiables for me. And by the way, these are things that are non-negotiables for my client. And we want to get alignment in between those two things. It helps you figure out where your starting point is and where your limit is and where you want to be. So there’s always a target someplace.

Liston Witherill:
That’s Jeb Blount, author of seven sales books in his latest book, Inked, explores effective negotiation techniques. Now, you may know I’ve recorded episodes before on negotiation. I’ve some really strong thoughts about how to go about it and even beg the question should you negotiate?

Liston Witherill:
But when I saw Jeb’s book, I was interested in talking to Jeb about a particular chapter tucked into the back of the book. And it’s a topic that doesn’t get covered much. And that’s how to have a plan for negotiation before you actually negotiate with your client. Here’s the thing. Negotiations are high stakes and they happen quickly and you don’t get to do them over. If you’re not happy with the way a negotiation goes, then the best you can do is learn from it and apply what you learn the next time.

Liston Witherill:
That’s why I think planning is so important. There’s no pressure like the idea that you may lose something, as in you say the wrong thing during the negotiation, and you might lose the deal. It’s a common fear, but it’s mostly unfounded. The best way to combat this fear is to enter the negotiation with a plan, a plan that spells out the minimum deal you’re willing to accept, a plan that spells out all of the different aspects of a deal beyond price that matter to your client like payment terms and access and scope and more. You need to know what you’re willing to trade off before you enter that negotiation.

Liston Witherill:
So, in this episode of Modern Sales, I’ll talk to Jeb Blount about his approach to sales negotiation planning, ways you can plan for the next time you’re in the thick of it. And some secret negotiation strategies that’ll set you up for success.

Liston Witherill:
Welcome to Modern Sales, a podcast that’ll help you sell more by understanding how people buy. I’m your host Liston Witherill, Founder of Serve Don’t Sell. I dig through academic research, interview people inside and outside of sales and nerd out on psychology, economics, and neuroscience to figure out how people make decisions. And I am on a mission to change the way 100 million people sell so that buying B2B services can be just as easy as Sunday morning. Wouldn’t that be nice?

Liston Witherill:
If you’re listening on Spotify hit that follow button so that you don’t miss a single episode. And if you’re listening on iTunes or Apple podcasts, please subscribe and leave an honest review. It helps me get the word out for the show so that we can together change the way 100 million people sell. Thank you in advance for your help. Now to the show. How do you plan for negotiation that keeps you ready for just about anything in one of the most high-pressure client situations? Find out right after the short break.

Liston Witherill:
Hello, and welcome to Modern Sales. I’m Liston Witherill, and I am here with a very special guest today, a prolific author, a sales trainer, someone who definitely knows what he’s talking about sales in his recent book, Inked. It’s all about getting the deal done in negotiation. Jeb Blount, welcome to the podcast.

Jeb Blount:
Well, thank you so much for having me on. It’s a pleasure. It was a very kind introduction.

Liston Witherill:
Excellent. I’ve read a lot of negotiation books as I’m sure you have. One of the things that stood out to me about your book is you have a section in there on negotiation planning. Why don’t we start with the basics? What does it mean to do negotiation planning?

Jeb Blount:
Let’s maybe step back for a moment and think about planning as a whole. So anything in sales that you wing is stupid. So winging it is the dumbest thing you can do in anything you do. So from the very moment that you walk into a deal, you should be planning for what’s my objective. Why am I here? What’s going on?

Jeb Blount:
And when we think about negotiating planning as a whole, negotiating planning should begin at the first hello. So from the moment that we move into that initial meeting, one of the things that I should be building is a stakeholder list.

Jeb Blount:
So that stakeholder list is going to be what are the things that are important to each of the stakeholders in the deal? Now, if it’s just one person, so if I’m dealing with a single stakeholder, not a big deal, right? That’s just one human being. I’m getting their list of things, but there are multiple stakeholders. Each of those stakeholders is going to have a list of things that are important to them.

Jeb Blount:
That list is going to get aggregated into a single stakeholder list. That’s going to be important to know because I’m also going to have a list as well. These are the things that I want to get out of this deal as well. And I need to know what my list is.

Jeb Blount:
So planning in particular with negotiation begins the very beginning. And this is why from the get-go in this book, we don’t say negotiating is different than sales. We say that it is integrated in sales. You can’t separate negotiation to sales process. That’s the beginning.

Jeb Blount:
But let’s then flip forward. So we’ve done that work. We’ve asked great questions. We’ve done good discovery. We’ve got a stakeholder list. We’ve got an idea of what’s going to be important, and what’s not going to be important. We should be along the way surfacing up non-negotiables. And that happens in discovery.

Jeb Blount:
And aside on that, a lot of salespeople skirt around those things, they don’t ask the hard questions. They don’t surface potential objections or potential roadblocks. And that’s a really bad move. It’s important that you get all the non-negotiables, all those issues on the table very early, so that you’ve gathered all of that up.

Jeb Blount:
So you’ve done your presentation and proposal and the stakeholder group has selected you as the vendor of choice. And what that sounds like is we really want to do business with you, but we’ve got to work out some issues. We’ve chosen you, but we still got some things we need to work out on the contract or on the pricing or on the terms and conditions or some of the things that around the deal. So now you’ve got to go negotiate.

Jeb Blount:
Now that can happen really fast. Like it could be, if it’s a transactional deal, you’re planning might be just the work that you’ve done in your head. You write a few things down, take a break before you answer, and then walk through where you want to go. But in a bigger deal where there’s a lot at stake, you’re going to have a little bit of time in between the do you want to buy and let’s negotiate a deal. And in those cases, you should be prepared.

Jeb Blount:
Now with preparation means that, for example, if you’re walking into your presentation, I’ve done all my work. Let’s say we’ve done three to five calls. I’m going into a final presentation. I need to be prepared at that moment to negotiate because in some situations the stakeholder group is going to go “Look, we really like this. Let’s work a deal out.” And if you’re not prepared you’re going to get hammered, so you need to have that done.

Jeb Blount:
In a lot time cases though, the stakeholder’s group is going to go Listen, this is really good. We need to sit down and think about this for a moment or work through some issues. And let’s schedule a call next week to talk about it. And you’ve got a pretty good idea whether you got the deal or not in that moment, but then you’re going to come to a place where you may need to negotiate. You need to be prepared.

Jeb Blount:
In an all of those cases, we’re start thinking, right? We’re thinking about what that preparation is going to look like. The way that we prepare people, or we help people prepare we have a sales negotiation planner. It’s a beautiful planner. It’s a two-sided planner. If you get the book, if you buy the book, there’s a little link to it in the book and you can go and download that planner, and then you can print it out. We print them out in wall-sized poster. So we put them up on a wall.

Jeb Blount:
What it allows us to do is once we’ve decided we need to plan for a negotiation, it allows us to identify all the stakeholders. What are the stakeholder lists? What motivation does each stakeholder have in order to get the deal done? So what’s their level. Are they people that are for us are against us? We’re able to take a look at the negotiating parameters. So the parameters are typically the things that I can and cannot negotiate. And the parameters also are what’s the risk to the parties, right? So that’s important.

Jeb Blount:
If it’s a really high-risk situation, then you need to de-risk it if you want to get people to agree on a deal. It’s going to include all the things that you can and cannot negotiate. So these are the things that are non-negotiable for me. And by the way, these are things that are non-negotiables for my client. And we want to get alignment in between those two things. It helps you figure out where your starting point is and where your limit and where you want to be. So there’s always a target someplace.

Jeb Blount:
If I start here, I want to target this particular zone with my terms and conditions and my pricing, so I know where I’m going to be. And most importantly, it helps you build a give-take playlist. Once you enter the negotiation, and when I say enter, it’s not like there’s formal door that you walk through me, sometimes negotiation’s just happening.

Jeb Blount:
But once the negotiation begins, there’s a give and take until both parties feel like there’s no place else for them to go and they have to align on a deal or they walk away. So my job as a sales negotiator is to impel the other party to stop negotiating and make a deal. The way that I do that is I create some level of pain for them by taking things away from them, right? Or giving things to them, I give them a carrot in order to stop negotiating either one.

Jeb Blount:
So the give-take playlist is essentially all of the things that I can give in order to get something back from them to cause them to align on the deal or the things that I can take in order to align on a deal. Let me give you an example of both.

Jeb Blount:
When we give, we want to give something called funny money. In most cases, we want to give something that doesn’t cost us anything in our profit margin. An example of that might be, let’s say I’m selling you a new piece of equipment, or I’m selling a new piece of software and there’s training that comes with that. I could put the training in as a… I could put it into the deal as a cost. And if you say, well, listen, I need you to drop your price by 20%, I can take the training out. I can say, well, if I drop my price 20%, I’m going to need to take the training out.

Jeb Blount:
Well, the training is really important for you. You might say, no, I want the training. Now, we’ve got a place where we can align. Well, I can’t reduce 20% and still give you the training, so we can come to a place there. Or you may say, listen, I need you to drop your price. And you can say, listen, I can’t drop my price, but I can give you the training.

Jeb Blount:
So I can give you this value-added training in order to get you to say, okay, well, that sounds like a fair trade to me. The training didn’t really cost me anything because I’m going to do it anyway. So I used that as funny money in the deal. But if I don’t know where those things are it’s a problem.

Jeb Blount:
Now, the second way that you can take things out of the deal is the stakeholder list. If you remember, we were talking about what are the things that are important to the stakeholders. So typically if you’re working on a longer cycle, more complex deal, it’s more collaborative.

Jeb Blount:
As you’re going through discovery, you’re finding out what’s important to this stakeholder group. And they’re essentially building the deal with you, right? They’re saying this is important to us. We want this, we want this. We want to accomplish this. These are the things that we want to do. So what really savvy negotiators do when they’re in that situation is they start taking things out of the deal. And they’re not taking things out of the deal that they put in, they’re taking the things out of the deal that the stakeholders put in.

Jeb Blount:
So the stakeholder says, we need A, B, C, and D. Great. But we need you to take 20% off and you go, great. Well, if I take 20% off, I got to take D out. Well, we don’t want to take D out. D’s really important to us. Okay, well, we need to leave D in. We can’t take 20% off.

Jeb Blount:
Then you go find some funny money that you may be able to fill in. And that’s super important especially when you’re dealing with procurement or professional buyers who you have a stakeholder group, and they’re separating the negotiating out of the stakeholder group, you start taking things away. They got to go back to the stakeholder group. And the stakeholder group says, no, we want that in the deal.

Jeb Blount:
So they start tying the hands of procurement in that process. So as you start thinking about planning as a whole, if we just recap this, start at hello from the moment that you walk into a deal from the moment, you start thinking about what negotiating is going to look like.

Jeb Blount:
You may not have to negotiate. If you do a really good job of progressing through the sales process, do a really good job of building a business case, do a really good job of understanding your stakeholders, do a fantastic job of presenting your solution. And a lot of cases there won’t be any negotiating. They’ll just say, let’s just do business. And there may be some objections to a couple of things, but not really negotiating.

Jeb Blount:
But as you go through that process, you have to plan and believe that there’s going to be a negotiation so that you get ready for that from the beginning. So you start building out your stakeholder list. You start thinking about where your parameters are. You need to know where your limits are. You think about where in this deal from the very beginning you want to be from a target standpoint both on margin and price, understanding where those things are. That helps you build your proposal because you may have to back up from the proposal just a little bit.

Jeb Blount:
And then before you walk into a presentation or after the presentation, when the stakeholder group says, “Hey, we need to work on this.” Then you can use a planner type tool to move into the negotiation. Now, we use a sales EQ planner, which is sort of a whole deal planner. And then you attach that to the negotiation plan. It all kind of rolls together. It allows you to get your mind around what you need to do. That’s the technical planning piece.

Jeb Blount:
The next most important piece is planning for scenarios. So what a lot of people do is, okay, well, I’ve got all these pieces together, but then they don’t get someone like you to say, okay, well, what if they do this? Or what if they do that? We call that murder boarding, right?

Jeb Blount:
Let’s find every reason why in the negotiation, you’re going to lose the deal because you negotiate the wrong thing or say the wrong thing. Once you get everything together, what you want to do is run through all of the different ways a negotiation might go and practice it.

Jeb Blount:
My experience over 30 years is when you do that, you walk in, there is nothing they say, nothing they do that you’re not ready for, your brain’s not ready for that you haven’t prepared for. And it’s almost always infinitely easier than when it was when you were practicing.

Liston Witherill:
Let’s talk about practicing for a second because I think for a lot of people this is where the rubber meets the road, right? Because you go into these conversations and you only have one chance, and it’s a crucial conversation, right? If you screw it up, you look unprofessional at best. And the other party loses confidence in you as a provider in your entire company, unfortunately. What are some ways that I can practice negotiation effectively? This is a question I get asked all the time. I’m wondering, how do you recommend people do this.

Jeb Blount:
They took my whiteboard out of here. So, I can’t draw this for you, but essentially… in fact, I actually have one. So I’m going to show you. Here we go, look at that, whiteboard. If you think about a deal, right? And you look at a deal like this, your proposal is here. So, I give a proposal. Here’s my pricing here.

Liston Witherill:
Just for the listeners only, the proposal is at the end of the process.

Jeb Blount:
It’s the beginning of the process. So this would be we’re going backwards, right? Yeah, the beginning of the process. So if you’re just listening to this at the beginning of the process of proposal, all the proposal is, is a written offer to buy, right? So I’m giving you a written offer to buy. This is where I want to be.

Jeb Blount:
The best case scenario is I give you a proposal and you go, “I like it. That’s pretty good.” Think about a sticker on a car like our price tag on anything. The price tag is the proposal, the sticker on the car is a proposal, then way back down over here, you have your limit.

Jeb Blount:
At the very end, so the top ends of proposal. You’re giving them a proposal. This is your limit. And this is your proposal. This is your offer to buy so down here at the limit. That’s as far as you can go. Now, limit is pricing terms and conditions. It can be margins. It could be any number of things. It could be contract link, but there are limits. And some of those limits may not be things that impact here. But the point is is that this is where you start. This is where the limit is.

Liston Witherill:
Just for the listeners once again, basically, we have a spectrum and on the left side, we have the minimum deal we’d be willing to accept. And on the right side, we have the deal that we really, really want.

Jeb Blount:
Right. Now, on this side, this is the upper end for the buyer. And this is the lower end for the seller here. So, the limit is the seller’s limit. The proposal is typically the buyer’s limit number. You’re going to give a proposal and they’re going to go, “Man, that was a pretty good proposal, but we’re going to pay you more.” They’re not going to do that. So, you got to get that right.

Jeb Blount:
In the middle, if you say upper limit is your proposal, the lower limit is your limit, somewhere in the middle is your target. And when I say target, this is a place where if you back up into the target, so this is your fallback zone as a way. If you fall back into the target, you’ve maintained price integrity, you’ve got a good deal that allows you to surface your customer so there’s margin and it. You didn’t take your commissions completely off the table because a lot of salespeople they negotiate their commissions away because a lot of commissions are based on margin or on particular terms and conditions.

Jeb Blount:
For example, I used to get paid a lot more if I got longer contracts. So if I got a five-year contract versus a two-year contract, my commission was almost 10 times more because the lifetime value of that customer in a five-time contract. So this is the target zone.

Jeb Blount:
As you start thinking about this from a scenario planning standpoint. We start thinking about scenario planning, this is where this begins. I say, this is my proposal. The first set of scenario planning is what am I going in at? Based on everything I know, based on the list that I’ve got from the stakeholders, all the things that are in discovery, the business case that I built and also understanding the math, right?

Jeb Blount:
So the math is what are the measurable business outcomes and the metrics that matter to this customer? If I know what outcomes they’re looking for, and I know what metrics that matter, I get my calculator out and say, the value that I’m delivering is this. And when we say value, when we start thinking about value just real quickly. Value is measurable business outcomes plus emotional outcome. So emotional outcomes are what stakeholders get from that, that equals value.

Jeb Blount:
When I put this together and I start thinking about value this way, I’m thinking about my proposal wants to maximize the value for my prospect while also maximizing the profit for me. Because it’s, I’m here to make a profit.

Jeb Blount:
When I start thinking about scenario planning, I begin here. The scenario planning is each step along this backup, these are different scenarios. What if they did this could I do this? What if they offer this, could I do this? What if they offered this, could I do this? All designed to keep me in this space here. I want to stay here.

Liston Witherill:
Is it fair to say that in the scenario planning process, basically, you’re looking for an appropriate compromise or sort of comeback. So whenever they say we want the price to be X percent lower, you’re looking for a planned response to that. Okay, if we did that, then I would need that.

Jeb Blount:
That’s correct. That takes us back to give-take. That’s what we were talking about give-takes. The give-take fits into this space right here. I want to stay in this zone here. Now, why would I end up in the limit zone? Part of my scenario planning might be this. I want this deal. I want this deal back. I’ve been in those situations.

Jeb Blount:
I’m in a situation where… and this is a great time. We’re having this conversation in the middle of sort of a financial upheaval in the global economy. There’s a lot of companies out there. I need the deal. I need the money. So as long as I can not lose money, I’m going to take the money because I need the revenue coming in, I need cashflow.

Jeb Blount:
In some cases, my scenario planning says I want to stay in here, but I’m willing to go all the way back here. What I don’t want to do is lose it. So you said, what are the things that can get me kicked out of the deal? So if I really, really need the deal, I need to be very careful in nuance in this space so that I don’t come off too hard and then lose my space.

Jeb Blount:
But at the same time, if I don’t do my scenario planning in a place where I really want the deal and motivation is a good thing to talk about here. The more motivated you are to get the deal, the more you’re willing to give away to get the deal. The same thing with your prospect. The more motivated they are to get in the deal, the more they’re willing to compromise in order to make the deal.

Jeb Blount:
If I really, really want it and I don’t do the scenario planning, here’s what happens. We walk into the negotiation, you go, listen, you can do better than this. And I go, great. How about that? And I go all the way to my limit in one swoop, and I lose nothing else.

Liston Witherill:
Right.

Jeb Blount:
If I do my scenario planning in a situation like that I go, okay, well, if they do that, here’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to try to give here, we’re going to try to do this. We’re going to try to give that. We’re going to try to give this. We’re going to try to hold onto our price as long as we can to see if we can get better than this. Because we’ve already agreed that we’ll take this, and we’ll be happy with it. But if we can get better than that, we’re okay.

Jeb Blount:
Now, if I don’t need the deal, let’s say that I’ve got a full pipeline. I’ve got a lot of clients. I have the unlimited ability to deliver. So, I want to take a few clients. For example, me, I do 24 speeches a year. That’s it. No more. I’m doing 24. So if I do 24 speeches a year, and I’ve got 100 opportunities to give speeches, guess what happens? My price is as high as I can go within reason so that I don’t lose any, but I don’t have to go compromise because I’ve got 100 other opportunities to get in.

Jeb Blount:
So, I may be in a situation where I don’t need it that bad. So, I say my target moves up here. I’m willing to negotiate because I’m not willing to be non-negotiable. If you’re completely non-negotiable, and a lot of cases, that’s just pure arrogance. So you need to be able and you got to think there’s some things I need to move on. So you always want to have some level of funny money.

Jeb Blount:
But I may say I’m not negotiable with my price, but I’ll do this for you. If you pay that price, I’ll do another workshop for you, or I’ll give your people access to some e-learning or I’ll do after things. So I can do add-ons funny money. They don’t actually cost me anything, but they add on value and I can hold my price.

Jeb Blount:
So in the scenario planning A, I really need the deal. I need to make sure that I’m prepared not to give it all the way when I start off. In a scenario planning where I don’t need the deal, I need to start thinking about, okay, well, how can I negotiate in order to maintain my price integrity in order to maintain my margins.

Jeb Blount:
And then for all the other deals out there, which are, look, I really want to make a deal with you. I really want to do business with you, but I also want to make sure that we’re making a profit. I want to earn a commission check. I want to do those things.

Jeb Blount:
Most deals are going to fit in this space right here, where you’re basically saying, okay, in order to get here, where do we start? And that’s where if we really think about it, where I start scenario planning. For all the people listening, I turned the page on my whiteboard here.

Jeb Blount:
But if I’m starting, the way I scenario plan is I start with their first move. So I just go, what’s the first move. So what if they ask for this? What if they say that? And so all I’m going to do is say what are the 10 different first moves they can make? So they have move number one, move number two, move number three.

Jeb Blount:
And then all I do on two, three. So here are the three different moves is in these situations what is my give or what is my take? Then I just basically build a give-take playlist, right? If they make this move, then I’m going to go here, give-take, give-take, give-take, give-take.

Jeb Blount:
My whole idea is to go down this process and say, what can I give them? Or what can I take from them? By the way, I never give anything without taking something away. So if they say, “We’re going to need you to give us the delivery at no cost.” Well, they didn’t bang me up on my pricing. They didn’t want the delivery at no cost, but the delivery is going to be expensive because I got to track it in, I’ve got to do this. I’ve got to do that. I’ve got to do that.

Jeb Blount:
I might say, okay, well, I’m may be able to work with the delivery on there. And I understand where you’re coming from the delivery. However, if we’re going to do delivery take, I’m going to need you to give me another order for this particular product. Or I’m going to need you to increase the order to this much.

Jeb Blount:
In order for me to give you this, you have to do this. So, I just start thinking through what those scenarios might be. The best thing to give is funny money. Funny money is something that has value to the customer, but doesn’t have a lot of value to you. It doesn’t cost you anything to give funny money away. So my training thing. The best thing you can do there.

Jeb Blount:
But let’s just say, they say, “We need you to drop your prices 20%.” You could say, “Look, I’m willing to come off 5% on my prices. However, in order to give you 5% of our prices, we’re going to need to change the service day to Thursday from Wednesday.” But you knew that the stakeholders for them Wednesday was really important for the service day.

Jeb Blount:
When you say that they’re going to go, “No. We need the service day to be on Wednesday.” And, “Well, the problem I have with Wednesday is that I have everybody who wants to be on Wednesday. So I have a limited number of staff. So in order to take care of you, I got to go and hire more people. I got pay people more. So I’m not going to be able to have the margin to do that. But Thursday, I don’t have a whole lot of people on Thursday. So, I’m able to give you a discount if you move to Thursday.” And that may be in your favor to do that type of thing. All you’re doing from scenario planning is what would be their first gambit. What would the first move? What would you do?

Jeb Blount:
Let’s take another scenario. Another scenario would be what if they did this, scenario three, what if they did that? What if they did this? All the way through and then murder boarding is what’s going to kill the deal? So if we got to a point where we will we come to a point where we would have to walk away or they would have to walk away? And how can we avoid for either party to get put into that corner before we align on a deal?

Jeb Blount:
But all we want to do with the give-take process is just make it painful. By the way, they can do the same thing for you. They can push you to the point where it’s so painful to you that you go, “Okay, I’m willing to take that.” And that’s fine. It goes on both sides.

Jeb Blount:
But if I make it painful for them, and painful is not a mean thing. I’m not trying to hurt them. I want them to feel like I’ve taken so much away from them, they’re not willing to give anything else up and they go, “Okay, let’s make a deal.” And then they’re willing to negotiate. But I’m going to go back to something really important about this planning.

Jeb Blount:
This didn’t start the moment that I was in the negotiation, this started at my very first meeting at it. I was walking through all the way through. I’m thinking about what the negotiation might look like from the very beginning. My ultimate goal is not to have a negotiation. I want to be able to get the price and terms and conditions that I deserve and I want them to accept those without negotiating.

Jeb Blount:
I want them to do that because I presented an unassailable business case that hits the mark and causes them to be so motivated to do business with me that they don’t want to negotiate. They feel like the value trade is fair from the get-go.

Jeb Blount:
Now, you’re going to get, I’d say maybe, 20% of your deals will end up in that space, but that’s the ultimate goal. So if you start there, I want to get it right from the get-go. Then if you’ve done all that work, you’ve done the right way, one of the beautiful things about being here in this space right here is that suddenly you have the moral high ground, I’ve done all the work, I’ve done everything right. I’ve addressed everything that you need and now you’re coming back.

Jeb Blount:
And that moral high ground is super important, especially when you have a stakeholder group who decides that it’s a good idea for them to send you off to procurement. So I don’t know if that makes any sense, but that’s how I go about planning.

Liston Witherill:
It makes great sense my friend. I think we’ll stop there. So this has been episode one of two. We’re going to come back and talk about virtual selling once again with Jeb Blount sales.gravy.com. Jeb, thanks for being here, and we’ll talk again soon.

Jeb Blount:
Awesome.

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Up next…

Check out the four sales fundamentals every top performer masters, how to use value-based selling to increase your leverage, and how to improve your remote selling skills as the world becomes more virtual.

And check out the SDS method if you want to improve your sales process.

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