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How to Set Next Steps at Every Meeting with Mark Fershteyn of Recapped

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Setting next steps is really the 80/20 of selling. To keep momentum in your deals, set next steps at the end of every meeting, every call, or any other interaction you have with prospects. In this episode, Mark Fershteyn, CEO of Recapped.io, talks about the process he uses to set next steps, and how you can start today. 

For more information on remote selling and a complete list of links mentioned in this podcast, visit this remote selling article on our website.

Interested in checking out Recapped?

Recapped is a software tool that’ll help you and your clients stay on the same page at every step of the sales process. Think of it as a kind of mini-website and project management tool for every deal you have.

Just head over to recapped.io/modernsales to check it out. You can sign up for a free account, and get 20% off for being a Modern Sales listener, if you do decide to sign up.

And if you’d like to see how Liston (the host of Modern Sales) is using Recapped to sell advertising on the show, you can check out his Recapped page here.


How to Set Next Steps at Every Meeting with Mark Fershteyn of Recapped:

Full Transcript

Mark Fershteyn:
In short terms it’s the velocity. It’s making sure that nothing slips and that you’re not allowing any delays to happen between the deal. A lot of selling is really just managing what happens when you’re not in the room. A lot of the conversations that your stakeholders and your champion is having, you’re not in the room and you’re not present. So it’s your job to keep whatever product or offering you’re selling, top of mind. And one of the easiest ways to do that is to not let three months go by between a meeting. You have a meeting today, they’re excited about it, they love what you have to offer. Tomorrow, a fire could happen and their priorities shift, so you need to act as quickly as you possibly can to drive every next step.

Liston Witherill:
That’s Mark Fershteyn, CEO of Recapped.io. He’s built his product around this core idea, and I can tell you from experience, setting next steps, a clear set of actions understood and agreed upon by both buyer and seller, is the single most important change you can make if you’re not doing it now. Over the weekend, I made a five pound roast. It took 29 hours to cook it in the sous vide. Wow, was it delicious. But, you can’t make a roast well every time without some kind of recipe. And a recipe is simply a series of steps. Season the roast and add oil, place it in a bag, let it sit in the sous vide for 29 hours at 135 degrees Fahrenheit. Take it out, let it rest for 20 minutes. Sear it for two minutes on each side, bonus points for using bacon fat. Cut and serve perfect meat.

Liston Witherill:
Now, selling isn’t a recipe, but it sure does require a series of actions to work. That’s all it is. And you need someone else, your buyer, to do some of those steps too. In this episode of Modern Sales, I’m talking to Mark Fershteyn about his approach to next steps, his exact model that you can use for your own sales process and some key pitfalls to avoid.

Liston Witherill:
Welcome to Modern Sales, a podcast that’ll help you sell more by understanding how people buy. I’m your host, Liston Witherill founder of Serve Don’t Sell, and I dig through academic research, interview people inside and outside of sales, and nerd out on psychology, economics and neuroscience to figure out how people make decisions. And I am on a mission to change the way 100 million people sell, so that buying B2B services can feel just as exciting as getting a shiny new computer. Yes, I’m a nerd, but humor me. Wouldn’t that be nice? If you’re listening on Spotify, hit that follow button so that you don’t miss a single episode. And if you’re listening on iTunes or Apple Podcasts, please subscribe and leave an honest review, as long as, of course, it’s five stars. It helps me get the word out for the show so that we can, together, change the way 100 million people sell. Thank you in advance for your help. Now to the show.

Liston Witherill:
How should you approach next steps in your sale? And what’s the one thing that decides the likelihood of you winning any individual deal? Well, you’ll find out in my conversation with Mark, coming up right after this short break.

Liston Witherill:
Hey there, welcome to Modern Sales. I’m Liston Witherill and I am here with Mark. Mark, I didn’t ask how to pronounce your name. How do I pronounce your name so I don’t screw it up?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, everybody screws it up. It’s Fershteyn.

Liston Witherill:
Fershteyn. I thought it may be German or something.

Mark Fershteyn:
It is, actually, I’m Jewish.

Liston Witherill:
Whenever I saw it written, I kept going like Fershteyn, which sounded totally German. So anyway.

Mark Fershteyn:
That’s 80% correct.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, cool. Well Mark, thank you for being on the podcast. Why don’t we start by you saying a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, I appreciate it. Thanks for having me. So I’m Mark Fershteyn the CEO of Recapped.io and really we’re the first project management platform for sales teams to use with their clients. And I’ve been in sales my whole life. Last decade, I’ve spent either being an enterprise sales rep myself or leading different sales teams and over a variety of different roles.

Liston Witherill:
Excellent. So you know something about sales and the purpose of our call today is to talk about how do we set next steps. So I asked you what did you want to talk about on the podcast and you said, let’s talk about setting next steps to which I immediately said that in my opinion is one of a very small handful of things that make the biggest difference for the most people.

Mark Fershteyn:
[inaudible 00:04:56]

Liston Witherill:
So why don’t we start there? Why is it so important to set next steps?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, that’s a great question. So I think first off, I mean you hit the nail on the head. It’s one of those things that I think almost everyone can get right, but almost everyone doesn’t. and if you do get it right, the impact that it has, not only on your deals but also your success as a sales leader can be incredible. And I think it’s arguably one of the most important aspects. But again, everyone, most people let it fall by the wayside because it’s really easy to, and I saw this firsthand when I was a rep and even when I was a leader, I’d bash, constantly, constantly remind my reps to try and set clear next steps. And it’s really hard to nail down. So I spent a lot of my time really focused on that.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, so you think about next steps in two different parts. One is the mechanical, just what do I do to set next steps and the other one is the mental aspect. So why don’t we start with the mental aspect or the mindset. What do we need to be thinking about setting steps?

Mark Fershteyn:
In order to actually even set good next steps. The mental aspects for it really I think are two parts. One is you have to be diligent. Which means if you’re on a call with a prospect or with a client, it’s really easy for you to get excited about the product and run over. You have to be diligent and stop it at the five or 10 minute Mark before the meeting’s over and say, “Okay, I know we have a lot more to cover, but let’s sit down and actually map out what needs to happen next.” Because if you don’t do that, then what’s going to happen is the last 30 seconds are going to be, “Hey, okay, cool. I’m going to send you an email and we’ll go from there.”

Mark Fershteyn:
And we’ve always been there. We’ve all been there. That’s the first step. And then the second one is you have to remind yourself what the next steps are for. It’s really to just keep the momentum going. But so here a Recapped we’ve been very lucky that we’ve been able to analyze close to 20,000 deals all the way from discovery all the way through codes and implementation. And what we found is that the number one metric that predicts a deal success is momentum. And if you let the momentum fall for any reason, it doesn’t matter what it is. It becomes really difficult to pick it back up. So you need to drive those next steps to provide value and keep momentum going.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, so I have a lot of questions about everything you just said, including why the sales police are coming for all the people who didn’t set next steps.

Mark Fershteyn:
I know.

Liston Witherill:
Let’s start here. Leave five to 10 minutes at the end. One pro tip I would give anybody listening to this is instead of setting your calls to end on the hour, set them for 25 or 55 minutes, which will force you to be conscious of the ending and give you time before your next call to actually do the stuff you promised. I think that that’s really important. You said keep momentum. What is momentum?

Mark Fershteyn:
In short terms, it’s the velocity. It’s making sure that nothing slips and that you’re not allowing any delays to happen between the deal. A lot of selling is really just managing what happens when you’re not in the room. All a lot of the conversations that your stakeholders and your champion is having. You’re not in the room and you’re not present. So it’s your job to keep whatever product or offering you’re selling top of mind. And one of the easiest ways to do that is to not let three months go by between a meeting. You have a meeting today, they’re excited about it, they love what you have to offer. Tomorrow, a fire could happen and their priorities shift. So you need to act as quickly as you possibly can to drive every next step.

Liston Witherill:
So on momentum, you said you’ve analyzed over 10,000 deals and in my notes it says you found momentum as a single most important metric for predicting a deal success. Isn’t it also the case though that that’s a little bit of a selection bias in that the deals that close faster tend to be the ones who are with clients who have the most burning problem and were most likely to close on their own and maybe we’re even sold before you even talked to them?

Mark Fershteyn:
Definitely, right. To some extent, it’s hard to figure out which ones those are from them selection. But through our data points that we actually are going to have a blog post on this coming out in the next couple of weeks where it actually analyzes this further. So for us, what we found is that even though if you’re selling very similar products to very similar companies, that’s time between those stages or what changed. And it really wasn’t any more than around actually having the best practices around next steps in most cases. Now obviously if they need something, but we’re not talking about the outliers, the tail end, we’re talking about the core 80% of deals that you’re working.

Mark Fershteyn:
And that’s why a lot of companies outreach and the top of funnel solutions, that’s why they also talk about sales velocity. If you’re really curious about this, Google the sales velocity calculator, input your metrics in there and it’ll tell you how much you’re earning per day as a sales team or as a sales rep. And if you can improve that 10 or 5% it could be a multimillion dollar impact just on your first quarter alone. And so it really does become the nature of the game.

Liston Witherill:
So in terms of keeping momentum, I’ve heard two ways of approaching this and I have my own preference, but I’ll reserve that for now. One way is to have your full sales process mapped out and know exactly what needs to happen at each step every step of the way. The other way is when you get to the end of the call, you ask your client, so where would you like to go from here? Or something else open-ended like that. What is your opinion on asking the client to direct things versus you just being very prescriptive and telling them what’s next?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, that’s a great question. I think the answer is yes. You have to do both. It’s not an either or, so a lot of the times if you’re selling something that I hear every single day from sales leaders is we’re educating people how to buy a product like ours. You may be selling something, let’s say a data analysis tool for, I don’t know if Salesforce managers or an admins, they may have never bought a product like yours or you may be selling an HR product to add of recruiting. What you want to do is not only lay out the foundation and the yellow brick road of what needs to happen AKA, “Hey, when we’ve worked with other companies like yours, these are usually the next steps.” And then you get their collaboration and say, “How does this line up with yours?” Because if you don’t do that, there could be a really big misalignment between the way that they buy and the way that you sell, and I’d argue that’s one of the biggest reasons why deals fall apart.

Liston Witherill:
I agree with that. I also think there’s another thing that you’ve touched on a little bit, but it’s worth addressing directly, which is a lot of data out there that’s pretty definitive. As soon as you get more than one person involved in the buying process, your sales success falls off a cliff and especially once you get five or more, it’s like lower than 10% likelihood you’re going to close any given deal. How do you think about getting solid next steps on the calendar when I don’t necessarily have access to every decision maker, but I know that they need to be consulted before we move to that next step?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, it’s an excellent question. I mean, what the average deal has what now? 7.2 stakeholders and-

Liston Witherill:
Oh my God.

Mark Fershteyn:
That was three years ago. So I’m excited because I’m, obviously I have a little skin in the game, but I imagine the average deal from what we’ve seen now, when I talk to customers, it’s double digits on the stakeholder side. A lot of what you’re doing in sales, again, is going back to the element that these conversations are happening, whether you’re in the room or not. So as a salesperson, your job is really to arm your champion with as much information so that way when they do go talk to that stakeholder that you don’t know yet, they are able to be successful because the person you’re selling to is probably not a sales person themselves. Their job is not to implement whatever product you’re doing.

Mark Fershteyn:
Their job is doing their job. And you just happen to be offering a better product that’s going to help their way or their life. So arming them and laying out this prescriptive path. I think that’s one of the easiest ways to start getting into that. And really what you’re doing is creating a project plan. Ultimately sales leaders or sales reps, even, especially when you’re working large, complex deals, you really just take on the role of a project manager. You might have those seven stakeholders and it can feel like you’re hurting cats if not worse. And so your job is really to just corral everybody together towards the common milestones and objectives, which is mutually beneficial.

Liston Witherill:
And I said I was going to hold back my preference, but my preference when laying out next steps or prompting for next steps is to tell the client, here’s what needs to happen for this to work. And the reason I’m for that rather than just leaving it up to them, is they don’t know how to buy from you. They don’t know how you do business internally. They don’t know what the best process is. And you as the expert, yes, seller, you are an expert in something. You should be an expert in how clients can best buy from you. I think telling them, here’s how we do things and here’s why. Are you ready to move? And still giving them the autonomy and control to say yes or no, but that’s my opinion. Okay, so now sometimes we get to that next steps part and we ask for a decision and we get pushback. The client won’t commit.

Mark Fershteyn:
Do we have two hours to discuss?

Liston Witherill:
Potentially. Sure.

Mark Fershteyn:
So I think, I mean obviously there’s a million different things that could be going through the clients head. You could have done a poor job of demonstrating value. They could be not an ideal customer. Ultimately, I think a lot of the times when they’re not committing is because the right expectations weren’t set up front.

Liston Witherill:
Assuming that they’re a good fit?

Mark Fershteyn:
Assuming that they’re a good fit. Yes. And assuming he did a great job demonstrating the product and showing value and everything else. A lot of it really comes down to, “Hey, we’re on this path together. And to to this end goal, which let’s say is the end of the month or wherever you plan on having these go live with this solution that we’re offering. Here are the things we need to do together to make sure that we’re both successful.” And there’s a lot of different ways you can go about it, but really just ensuring that you have that rapport. You have that trust and showing that you’re not just trying to do this because you’re trying to close a deal, but you’re really trying to help them be successful and enabled their whatever their role is or whatever you’re hoping to sell them.

Liston Witherill:
We talked a little bit about mindset. We talked about some what ifs. Let’s go into the framework. You have a very specific way of thinking about setting these next steps. What is the first thing I need to do?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, so let’s say you’re in the 10 minutes before the meeting ends, you end your conversation now you would, the first step you want to do is you recap what you heard. You want to get their buy in to really just make sure you’re on the same page. “Hey, listen, just to make sure we’re on the same page. Here’s what I heard from you. X, Y, Z, is that right?” You get their buy in. They say yes, maybe even ask them where on the priority this lies if it’s an earlier conversation, but really you’re just getting their buy in. From there, you want to start setting next steps. And obviously this is easy but you want number two is you want to dig deep. It’s not, “Hey, I’ll send you an email and we’ll talk about next steps.” You want to actually say what are the next steps?

Mark Fershteyn:
Here’s the next five steps that usually look like when we work with a company of your size. Am I missing anything? and when you start getting those, you really want to dig deep. What I mean by that is figuring out, okay, let’s say they are going to discuss it. That’s not the next steps. Yes, they may be discussing it with their boss, but what are they discussing? Who are they discussing it with? What could go wrong? Has it gone wrong before the boss that they’re talking to? What do they care about? Is there any reason they wouldn’t be interested? One of the things I like to ask is really just a simple open ended question of what could go wrong? And having them again as a champion walk you through every step of the way.

Liston Witherill:
Yeah. One question that I learned from a professor in grad school who was a sales guy and had a couple of successful exits, he would always ask, “Let’s fast forward a month from now if this totally fell apart, what happened?” And they’ll tell you. Right. “Oh, Oh, okay. Well so and so in this department they have a real problem with this idea.” Whatever it is. I like that question as well. But yeah, I think it is important to ask essentially like what are the risks for this to happen one way or the other? Because generally you’re talking to someone who really wants it to happen, but we know that it doesn’t always, so dig deep. How deep do we need to dig? If someone says, I need to go talk to so-and-so, at what point are we satisfied? When do we have enough information to feel like there’s clarity there?

Mark Fershteyn:
I mean it’s going to depend, but I’d say usually what I always train my reps is until you feel really uncomfortable, you’re going to feel like you’re awkwardly asking too much. That’s probably a good indicator that you’re digging deep enough. And until that’s happening, and I think really the third step in this framework that we use, really, I think it helps mind that is really just wrapping it up. Saying, “Okay, we do all of these things and that’s it. Then the deal is done. You guys are implemented onboarding.” And immediately that’s going to prompt the prospect to say, “Well, no, now we have to go talk to the committee and now we have to go do procurement or legal.” So taking that and saying, and literally just keeping repeating that throughout the process. “Okay, and then we’re done?” “Oh no. Well, we still have three more steps that need to happen.” “And then we’re done?” “Yes.” “Okay, great.” So here’s the next steps that we have. Here’s a list.

Liston Witherill:
It sounds like in some ways when you’re asking for next steps that helps map out what the deal looks like, how you sell, and also how the client buys. Is this something that I’m doing? So the dig deeper part in particular, where you’re saying and then we’re done and then we’re done. Do I just need to do that very early in the sale so I can map out the whole thing and then we have a map to follow so we can get to our destination? Or am I having to do it every time we have a meeting?

Mark Fershteyn:
I would definitely do it. One, you want to lay the groundwork essentially early on. So whether that’s after the first product demo, probably wouldn’t do it on your first call if it’s a discovery, you still don’t know if this is a mutual fit. Really that starts coming in when you have a verbal agreement in some aspect. And then you’re always going to be referring back to that plan on other subsequent meetings. So you’re constantly, this isn’t just going to be something you lay out once and you’re done with it. I wish sales was that easy, but they’re going to get behind on tasks. You’re not going to be able to get information to them in time. Things are going to happen, but this really, this checklist of everything that needs to happen or really an action plan is what you need to constantly keep reiterating on and working on.

Liston Witherill:
Okay, so in this scenario we ask, is that it? And we’re finally satisfied, the client finally goes, “Yeah, I guess that is it.” I just came up with 12 things, but I can’t think of number 13 where do we go from there?

Mark Fershteyn:
That’s a good question. I think the most important part of this is now you have to make it mutually accountable. It doesn’t matter at all, if you just spend the last 10, 20 minutes digging deep and creating this list, now you have to actually make that actionable. And what I mean by that is write out all of the next steps that you talked about. Literally create a checklist, put a due date on them and an owner. Another part of the data, when we analyze the 10,000 deals that went through our platform, we found that tasks that had a specific name on them and a due date, we’re 65% more likely to be a completed. And that’s nothing more than really just the psychological aspect of ownership and consistency. I mean, there’s a million studies around it, but you want to put their name on it and it becomes even more important as you have multiple stakeholders.

Mark Fershteyn:
So if you have five people you’re working with on the buyer’s side and you have a meeting coming up on Friday, every single one of them, if their name is visible to everyone else on the [inaudible 00:20:56]. Nobody wants to be the only person who didn’t show up doing their homework for the meeting. It helps drive the success. And then of course, part of that being accountable is send the calendar invites immediately. I love your tip about ending early is get those calendar invites, get everything actionable, get it all in the calendar because by the time next week it’s going to come filled up and you don’t know what’s going to happen.

Liston Witherill:
Totally. And actually my tip for the calendar is to set it while you’re on the phone and if you don’t have the technological prowess to do that, develop the skill it will be one of the most valuable things you do is just be able to send invites on the spot, which you should be able to do. One thing that I think is really important that I’d like to emphasize, you mentioned studies on accountability and ownership and consistency is I’ll ask. When we set the next steps I’ll say to the client, “So my understanding is you’re going to do X, Y, and Z by this date, is that right?”

Liston Witherill:
And then almost always they’ll say yes. And then usually I’ll say something like, “Boy, that’s a lot of work between now and then. Are you sure you can do all of that?” And they’ll say yes. And I’ll say, “Okay, cool. Well, I’ll make sure I write this down and capture it and follow up with an email or whatever.” But I think it’s really important to get their verbal commitment. I think of a sale is like a million little sales and one of those little sales is just getting them to commit to do something.

Mark Fershteyn:
Absolutely, I love it. Actually, one of the ways that we do that is when we’re cold calling, if we say, “Hey, we’re going to send you a calendar invite for this meeting.” We always turn it back around and say, “Can you do me a favor and can you promise to accept that?” And when you see that come through, so that way I know it’s on your calendar and of course you get the yes and what do you know? As soon as you send the calendar they accept it. I think it boosted our show rate by about 15, 20% when we started implementing that.

Liston Witherill:
Oh, that’s hilarious.

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah.

Liston Witherill:
And it’s such a small thing. It’s like, do you want fries with that? That famous question. Is there anything else on this idea of show rate? Because I think for teams that do a lot of outbound, this is a big issue. Is there anything else that you do to increase show rate?

Mark Fershteyn:
When I think of the initial call, it’s always really, you’re just giving them a teaser. I think one of the most common ways I guess deals fall apart is you start giving away too much information and you almost disqualify yourself onto the call. You want to pique their interest just enough to get them to show up and not any more than that. And that can be delicate, but that helped us. So for us in the early days when we’d hire SDRs, some of our most successful SDRs didn’t know that much about the product or the offering because we found there was a tipping point that once they knew too much, they were overselling and it was actually hurting both them and the business at large. But yeah, I mean there’s a million tips I could give. I think really just again, getting their accountability, getting their buy in, suggesting time upfront and really rolling to close five, six times. We always joke like until they hang up on you, it’s still a conversation,

Liston Witherill:
Just like negative responses to emails. You can turn that into a conversation because they took the time to hit reply and hit send.

Mark Fershteyn:
Absolutely.

Liston Witherill:
So you obviously have a lot of ideas and philosophy on setting next steps. You have a product, which I’ve used and quite like, and I think it’s been missing from the category and my understanding is it’s really good for two reasons. One is to help sales teams and sales people document all this stuff that we’re talking about, all the stuff that needs to happen, but it also helps teams who do onboarding and bringing on new clients. How did you take this idea of next steps in project management and project planning? How did that inform how you built Recapped and what really needed to be in there and what was essential?

Mark Fershteyn:
So a little bit of a sore spot for me. So there was one deal in particular when I was a rep at Citrix, pretty big company I was working in deal that would have netted me closest six figures in commission. It was the largest deal I’ve ever worked. We had it at the finish line and it was so close to being complete. And long story short is it ended up falling apart and it fell apart because of something completely avoidable we didn’t have buy in from some decision makers we didn’t even know about because I wasn’t doing a great job setting those next steps. And when this fell apart, I’d already spent them commission in my head, told my friends about it, it was going to be a big deal. So when I left Citrix and went to go become a VP of sales at my last role, it haunted me and I wanted to make sure that it wouldn’t happen again because when I spoke to my friends and did more research, it’s a pretty common thing.

Mark Fershteyn:
We all lose deals, but I wanted to prevent that as much as possible because I thought it was preventable. And the more I started digging into it and researching it, the more I realized that sales really is just project management at the end of the day, especially when you have complex deals. And whether you’re closing a deal or doing a pilot or onboarding a customer, you’re probably following the same steps. You’re getting their buy in, you’re moving towards a goal and there’s next steps and deadlines and stakeholders like it doesn’t matter.

Mark Fershteyn:
Unfortunately, when I went to go swipe my credit card to try and buy a product like this, it didn’t exist, which blew my mind. So I figured how hard could it be and paid some contractors to build out a solution just for us. And that ended up actually helping us close about 20 to 30% more deals or deals faster through using this. We had very clear AB test. Next thing you know, I posted about it on Facebook, 10 of my friends are paying me to use it and now we’re starting to get some real customers. So it really just snowballed as really this really just tool that I built for myself thinking it was just going to be a fun little side project.

Liston Witherill:
Awesome. It’s funny because I think, sales as a profession tends to have the reputation of being huge, big gregarious extroverts who talk all the time and are totally disorganized. Did you find like some cultural mismatch there at all when you’re basically saying, “Hey, what you really need to be is more organized and more disciplined?”

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, I mean, I think the most successful sales reps I’ve ever met and managed to have all been incredibly process driven. And then of course there’s always like the one lone wolf who has a million papers on his or her desk and is not organized at all, but is such a lovable person that [inaudible 00:27:20] closed deals and we all know that. But by and large, I think process is what drives it. And as a sales leader, there was such a big variation in my reps between my A plus star players and like my average rep. My A plus players were doing a great job setting these next steps, but I wanted a really repeatable way that they could all like my B and C players could also do it and also just make their life easier. Because maybe they weren’t sending these next steps because they didn’t know how or because they felt uncomfortable, so we could take that onus off of them and just make it a process that they follow every single time it was going to make their job easier.

Liston Witherill:
Final question for you. In one of my favorites in all of sales, how do you balance the need for process with also the need for someone to be relatable and authentic and themselves so that they’re not just a robot reading off of a script?

Mark Fershteyn:
I think it varies for everybody. You have some people who are just naturals who don’t need a script. I think by and large for most of us, I think of scripts as training wheels. When I start doing a process personally, the way I materialize it is I write out a script. I use that script to familiarize myself with the process and then I throw the script away once I’ve memorized it or I feel comfortable enough. And I usually apply that to just about everything. Obviously there’s the number one goal that you should do is always to be authentic and process should never get in the way of that. The tools that you use should really help with your ideas and your philosophies. If you don’t have the belief that you should be doing X, it doesn’t matter what tools you use, because you’re not going to be doing it right. So really they should just be a guiding force for keeping you accountable to your best practices, if that makes sense.

Liston Witherill:
It does make sense. Mark, thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much for sharing as much as you have. People want to learn more about you or Recapped, what should they do?

Mark Fershteyn:
Yeah, feel free to hit me up on LinkedIn. It’s just Mark Fershteyn. My email is mark@recapped.io. If you’re curious about Recapped, check it out again, recapped.io we’re actually launching a freemium product. That’s going to be completely free for every account exec, but everything crazy going on in the world right now. Really, we just want to give back and unleash the superpower that we feel we have and give it in the power of every account executive.

Liston Witherill:
Fantastic. And of course, all of that is linked in the show notes. Mark, thank you so much for being here.

Mark Fershteyn:
Thank you for having me.

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